Citation

Saved on a Smartphone or Stored in a Box? The Differential Attachment of Meaning to Digital and Handwritten Love Letters

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Pen-and-paper letter writing has dwindled in recent years with the development of email and cell phones for texting (Haggis and Holmes 2011; Brandt 2006). Sending Evites has replaced paper invitations for many celebrations. Love letters on paper are seen as rare enough such that even antique handwritten love letters have been featured as products to purchase on Etsy, a website devoted to the buying and selling of antiques and crafts. Important in the consideration of the effects of technology on social lives generally is a focus on the impact of technology on couples’ romantic relationship communication specifically, not just because love letters themselves are useful pieces of material culture that can symbolize a relationship, but because the changing nature of type of communication (handwritten v. digital) may alter the quality of the relationship itself. In other words, the format of a saved love letter may tell us something about the meaning-making process of a couple’s relationship surrounding that letter. Whether the saving of a letter is impacted by its form is also important to examine, especially as it may relate to demographic differences such as gender and age.

How does the symbolic meaning of digital and hard copies of love letters differ in terms of people’s conceptions of relationship memories?
Do age and gender impact the likelihood to maintain couplehood correspondences as memory-symbols, and are there gender and age differences in digital v. handwritten relationship memory-keeping practices?
Does stage (beginning, during, and breakup) of the relationship affect this meaning-making process?

The body of literature upon which this project is based is multi-disciplinary, from technology and relationships, to gender and kinship keeping via nostalgia and material culture.

Preliminary results reveal both age and gender differences in terms of the research questions.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

gender (29), communic (22), save (18), relationship (18), letter (17), women (17), men (16), like (15), age (14), handwritten (12), year (12), revisit (11), digit (11), use (10), differ (10), e.g (9), love (9), mean (9), old (8), 1 (8), social (7),
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.pacificsoc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707415_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Janning, Michelle. and Snyder, Emma. "Saved on a Smartphone or Stored in a Box? The Differential Attachment of Meaning to Digital and Handwritten Love Letters" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707415_index.html>

APA Citation:

Janning, M. and Snyder, E. , 2014-03-27 "Saved on a Smartphone or Stored in a Box? The Differential Attachment of Meaning to Digital and Handwritten Love Letters" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon Online <PDF>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707415_index.html

Publication Type: Formal research paper presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Pen-and-paper letter writing has dwindled in recent years with the development of email and cell phones for texting (Haggis and Holmes 2011; Brandt 2006). Sending Evites has replaced paper invitations for many celebrations. Love letters on paper are seen as rare enough such that even antique handwritten love letters have been featured as products to purchase on Etsy, a website devoted to the buying and selling of antiques and crafts. Important in the consideration of the effects of technology on social lives generally is a focus on the impact of technology on couples’ romantic relationship communication specifically, not just because love letters themselves are useful pieces of material culture that can symbolize a relationship, but because the changing nature of type of communication (handwritten v. digital) may alter the quality of the relationship itself. In other words, the format of a saved love letter may tell us something about the meaning-making process of a couple’s relationship surrounding that letter. Whether the saving of a letter is impacted by its form is also important to examine, especially as it may relate to demographic differences such as gender and age.

How does the symbolic meaning of digital and hard copies of love letters differ in terms of people’s conceptions of relationship memories?
Do age and gender impact the likelihood to maintain couplehood correspondences as memory-symbols, and are there gender and age differences in digital v. handwritten relationship memory-keeping practices?
Does stage (beginning, during, and breakup) of the relationship affect this meaning-making process?

The body of literature upon which this project is based is multi-disciplinary, from technology and relationships, to gender and kinship keeping via nostalgia and material culture.

Preliminary results reveal both age and gender differences in terms of the research questions.


Similar Titles:
In a Different Voice (and Text): Gender Differences in Communication Motives and Uses of Mobile Phone

“Why Women Like Boy’s Love Novels?”: Chinese Fujoshi Subculture and its Communication Practices Around Boy’s Love Novels

Gender Differences in Cigarette Smoking: the Relationship between Social Perceptions of Cigarette Smokers and Smoking Prevalene

Minority Women in Bangladesh: Intersectionality, Marginalization, and Gender-specific Social Capital


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.