Citation

Ukraine's "Nationalist" Movements: Unraveling Status Consistency and Dissatisfaction

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Abstract:

Sixty years have passed since Lenski (1954) wrote his seminal piece on the effects of status inconsistency, noting that many individuals may not maintain consistent positions along the dimensions of education, income, occupation, and ethnicity. In this paper I use the notion of status inconsistency to examine participation in the Orange Revolution in Ukraine in 2004. Status inconsistencies were more frequent in Ukraine under Soviet control, where party loyalty was used as a means of distributing social rewards rather than education. I hypothesize that despite the fall of the Soviet Union, loyalty to Moscow and the Russian regime was still used as a basis of assigning positions of authority in post-Soviet Ukraine throughout the 90s and early 2000s. Using two waves of the Ukrainian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey I hope to demonstrate that status-inconsistent individuals in Ukraine in 2002 had higher rates of participation in the Orange Revolution. In doing so I draw on the justice and legitimation literatures within social psychology and propose bridging the gap between status inconsistency and key elements of Expectations States Theory.
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Association:
Name: Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.pacificsoc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707820_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Anderson, Nadina. "Ukraine's "Nationalist" Movements: Unraveling Status Consistency and Dissatisfaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707820_index.html>

APA Citation:

Anderson, N. L. , 2014-03-27 "Ukraine's "Nationalist" Movements: Unraveling Status Consistency and Dissatisfaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707820_index.html

Publication Type: Research-in-progress presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Sixty years have passed since Lenski (1954) wrote his seminal piece on the effects of status inconsistency, noting that many individuals may not maintain consistent positions along the dimensions of education, income, occupation, and ethnicity. In this paper I use the notion of status inconsistency to examine participation in the Orange Revolution in Ukraine in 2004. Status inconsistencies were more frequent in Ukraine under Soviet control, where party loyalty was used as a means of distributing social rewards rather than education. I hypothesize that despite the fall of the Soviet Union, loyalty to Moscow and the Russian regime was still used as a basis of assigning positions of authority in post-Soviet Ukraine throughout the 90s and early 2000s. Using two waves of the Ukrainian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey I hope to demonstrate that status-inconsistent individuals in Ukraine in 2002 had higher rates of participation in the Orange Revolution. In doing so I draw on the justice and legitimation literatures within social psychology and propose bridging the gap between status inconsistency and key elements of Expectations States Theory.


Similar Titles:
Status Discontent or Moral Crusade? The Tea Party Movement and Theories of Conservative Social Movements

A Juxtaposition of the Rap and Grunge Movements of the 1990s: Were Rap and Grunge Movements Rebellious or Promotional of the Status Quo?


 
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