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See Me Now! Invisible, Undervalued, and Marginalized: Practicing Girlhood in Affective Space

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Abstract:

At a time when individualized narratives have replaced structural explanations like social class to account for inequality (Gillies, 2005), the material conditions of girls who are marginalized economically, politically, and socially are further being eroded in North America through the uneven outcomes of neo-liberal economic policies. Young women who are on the fringes of economic and social change are not only socially excluded but are under valued as contributing members to a future, individually oriented society. Nowhere is this undervaluing more apparent than for working class girls who are not in school, not employed, and who are utilizing social services. What does it mean to be a ‘girl’ for urban, working-class, young women at this time of record unemployment and diminished future prospects for all youth?

In this presentation I explore how working-class girls engaged in State services express their shared history of colonization, abjection, rejection, and pain by looking at the affective economies (Ahmed, 2004) circulating for female youth who are marked as ‘a problem’ or ‘abject’ and living at the margins of the post-industrial city of Vancouver, Canada. These girls participated in a two year critical, feminist ethnography. Specifically, in this paper I discuss the role of affect in the girls’ attempts to be recognized in various aspects of their everyday life. I engaged in this work in order to challenge hegemonic forms of power that construct a particular ‘girl’ image and that reinforce normative understandings of what it means to be a girl.
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Association:
Name: Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.pacificsoc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707837_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Skourtes, Stephanie. "See Me Now! Invisible, Undervalued, and Marginalized: Practicing Girlhood in Affective Space" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707837_index.html>

APA Citation:

Skourtes, S. , 2014-03-27 "See Me Now! Invisible, Undervalued, and Marginalized: Practicing Girlhood in Affective Space" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707837_index.html

Publication Type: Formal research paper presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: At a time when individualized narratives have replaced structural explanations like social class to account for inequality (Gillies, 2005), the material conditions of girls who are marginalized economically, politically, and socially are further being eroded in North America through the uneven outcomes of neo-liberal economic policies. Young women who are on the fringes of economic and social change are not only socially excluded but are under valued as contributing members to a future, individually oriented society. Nowhere is this undervaluing more apparent than for working class girls who are not in school, not employed, and who are utilizing social services. What does it mean to be a ‘girl’ for urban, working-class, young women at this time of record unemployment and diminished future prospects for all youth?

In this presentation I explore how working-class girls engaged in State services express their shared history of colonization, abjection, rejection, and pain by looking at the affective economies (Ahmed, 2004) circulating for female youth who are marked as ‘a problem’ or ‘abject’ and living at the margins of the post-industrial city of Vancouver, Canada. These girls participated in a two year critical, feminist ethnography. Specifically, in this paper I discuss the role of affect in the girls’ attempts to be recognized in various aspects of their everyday life. I engaged in this work in order to challenge hegemonic forms of power that construct a particular ‘girl’ image and that reinforce normative understandings of what it means to be a girl.


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