Citation

Nicki Minaj and the Politics of the Real: Real Blackness, Real Bodies, Real Feminism?

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Abstract:

Nicki Minaj is the best-selling female rap artist of all time. Our analysis of her unprecedented impact on popular culture is organized in four sections: Real Bodies, Real Blackness, Real Intimacy, and Real Feminism. In “Real Bodies,” we argue that Minaj has created her body as a product in and of itself, to be sold and consumed in the growing entertainment industry. We call this strategy the “body-product.” In “Real Blackness,” we describe the ways that Minaj’s representations of black identity both reinforce and challenge mainstream ideologies of blackness. Her focus on her body as an object for consumers, as a body-product, fits squarely into a larger historical tradition of the trafficking in black women’s bodies. By claiming to be “Black Barbie,” she embraces a long time anti-feminist symbol, while she simultaneously pushes back against the regime of white beauty. In “Real Intimacy,” we investigate the many ways that Minaj has created a unique sense of intimacy with her fan base. The intimacy is largely created through web 2.0 strategies where fans can participate in what we call, “body occupation.” Her fans, often called Barbz and Kens (after Mattel’s Barbie doll) can occupy or try on Minaj’s body by uploading their own photos and digitally inserting parts of Minaj’s body. Finally, in “Real Feminism,” we analyze how Minaj’s use of the term “bitch,” her adoption of the “Black Barbie” moniker, and her extremely controversial video, “Stupid Ho” all engage feminist discourse and practice in ambivalent and surprising ways.
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Association:
Name: Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.pacificsoc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707968_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Hunter, Margaret. and Cuenca, Alheli. "Nicki Minaj and the Politics of the Real: Real Blackness, Real Bodies, Real Feminism?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707968_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hunter, M. and Cuenca, A. , 2014-03-27 "Nicki Minaj and the Politics of the Real: Real Blackness, Real Bodies, Real Feminism?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707968_index.html

Publication Type: Formal research paper presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Nicki Minaj is the best-selling female rap artist of all time. Our analysis of her unprecedented impact on popular culture is organized in four sections: Real Bodies, Real Blackness, Real Intimacy, and Real Feminism. In “Real Bodies,” we argue that Minaj has created her body as a product in and of itself, to be sold and consumed in the growing entertainment industry. We call this strategy the “body-product.” In “Real Blackness,” we describe the ways that Minaj’s representations of black identity both reinforce and challenge mainstream ideologies of blackness. Her focus on her body as an object for consumers, as a body-product, fits squarely into a larger historical tradition of the trafficking in black women’s bodies. By claiming to be “Black Barbie,” she embraces a long time anti-feminist symbol, while she simultaneously pushes back against the regime of white beauty. In “Real Intimacy,” we investigate the many ways that Minaj has created a unique sense of intimacy with her fan base. The intimacy is largely created through web 2.0 strategies where fans can participate in what we call, “body occupation.” Her fans, often called Barbz and Kens (after Mattel’s Barbie doll) can occupy or try on Minaj’s body by uploading their own photos and digitally inserting parts of Minaj’s body. Finally, in “Real Feminism,” we analyze how Minaj’s use of the term “bitch,” her adoption of the “Black Barbie” moniker, and her extremely controversial video, “Stupid Ho” all engage feminist discourse and practice in ambivalent and surprising ways.


Similar Titles:
...while Black, Female, and Disabled : a Politic of Diversifying the Black Body

The Lynching of the Black Political Body: How Post-Civil War Political Terror Overthrew Reconstruction & Founded the Jim Crow South,1866-1877

Black Feminism, Women’s Rap Music and the Politics of Irreverence


 
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