Citation

Questioning the metrics: International civic measures and youth political actions in Chile and Colombia

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

In this study, the authors compare measures of youth citizenship and civic engagement, as defined by the International Civics and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS) 2009 to multiple types of citizenship. Two Latin American countries, Chile and Colombia, serve as comparative case studies, which test the frameworks of citizenship found in the ICCS and other typologies. Each nation takes a unique curricular approach to citizenship and civic education. The standards and supporting policy documents contain a vision of the nation’s “ideal” citizens (Westheimer & Kahne, 2004). While neither standards nor policy documents are static, they do identify a set of normative values that nations’ seek to impart to its young students (Biseth, 2011), which reflect different social and cultural understandings of citizenship, and have much to do with national history. These two countries potentially challenge the vision of citizenship presented in the ICCS and other citizenship frameworks.

Specifically, the researchers ask the following questions: What does ICCS 2009 lead us to believe about the nature of citizenship and youth civic engagement? What do the results from ICCS 2009 lead us to believe about the nature of citizenship and youth civic engagement in Colombia and Chile? How do Colombian and Chilean ministries of education conceptualize citizenship? Finally, is there evidence of youth civic engagement practices and conceptualizations that ICCS 2009 may not have captured?

To answer these questions, the researchers examine publications from the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) and ICCS evaluators. This portion of the analysis intends to clarify the goal of the international assessment and the underlying vision of the ideal type of citizen. Next, the outcomes of Colombia and Chile on the ICCS 2009 were analyzed and compared to multiple typologies of citizenship. The goals of ICCS and the nation-specific outcomes were also compared against the Colombian and Chilean policy documents that outlined the civic curricula and the citizenship vision for each nation. To answer the last question regarding the civic practice of young Colombians and Chileans, this analysis relies on policy documents and news media reports. Data resulted from Spanish and English searches in major databases and news archives. The policy documents are evaluated in Spanish, and translated where necessary to improve the understanding for an English-language audience.

The analysis in this critical review relies heavily on Westheimer and Kahne’s (2004) definitions of citizenship. Using this framework, the authors assess national policy and the ICCS evaluation metrics. Additional typologies are considered in an effort to understand the goals of citizenship education according to the IEA and the respective countries in this study. Among other typologies examined are activist citizen (Isin, 2009), citizen consumer (Yuval-Davis, 2011), and multicultural citizen (Rex, 1995).

Preliminary findings indicate that the ICCS metrics do not measure certain kinds of civic engagement that are culturally relevant in Chile and Colombia. The Westheimer and Kahne framework takes into consideration the justice-oriented citizen, but the international metrics for measuring citizenship pay little attention to independent or collective actions taken by students. The authors find that recent student protests in Chile and Colombia confirm that students are not only active and passionate citizens, but concerned about their educational futures. Long traditions of political engagement and advocacy meet the standards of citizenship according to many scholars—yet the Ministries of Education are tied to curricular improvement based on testing that ignores the strengths of their students and society. In the case of Colombia, outcomes of ICCS 2009 pushed the national Ministry of Education to highlight civics and citizenship education as a priority in their country (Schulz et al., 2011).

This study questions international achievement measures in an attempt to confirm their relevance. The authors suggest that the kind of citizenship measured internationally undervalues Colombian and Chilean students’ civic engagement as this research draws attention to examples of civic participation that ICCS metrics fail to capture. The authors consider policy implications of international testing in civics and citizenship for each country under evaluation.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708297_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Sausner, Erica. and Brezicha, Kristina. "Questioning the metrics: International civic measures and youth political actions in Chile and Colombia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Mar 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708297_index.html>

APA Citation:

Sausner, E. B. and Brezicha, K. , 2014-03-10 "Questioning the metrics: International civic measures and youth political actions in Chile and Colombia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708297_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this study, the authors compare measures of youth citizenship and civic engagement, as defined by the International Civics and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS) 2009 to multiple types of citizenship. Two Latin American countries, Chile and Colombia, serve as comparative case studies, which test the frameworks of citizenship found in the ICCS and other typologies. Each nation takes a unique curricular approach to citizenship and civic education. The standards and supporting policy documents contain a vision of the nation’s “ideal” citizens (Westheimer & Kahne, 2004). While neither standards nor policy documents are static, they do identify a set of normative values that nations’ seek to impart to its young students (Biseth, 2011), which reflect different social and cultural understandings of citizenship, and have much to do with national history. These two countries potentially challenge the vision of citizenship presented in the ICCS and other citizenship frameworks.

Specifically, the researchers ask the following questions: What does ICCS 2009 lead us to believe about the nature of citizenship and youth civic engagement? What do the results from ICCS 2009 lead us to believe about the nature of citizenship and youth civic engagement in Colombia and Chile? How do Colombian and Chilean ministries of education conceptualize citizenship? Finally, is there evidence of youth civic engagement practices and conceptualizations that ICCS 2009 may not have captured?

To answer these questions, the researchers examine publications from the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) and ICCS evaluators. This portion of the analysis intends to clarify the goal of the international assessment and the underlying vision of the ideal type of citizen. Next, the outcomes of Colombia and Chile on the ICCS 2009 were analyzed and compared to multiple typologies of citizenship. The goals of ICCS and the nation-specific outcomes were also compared against the Colombian and Chilean policy documents that outlined the civic curricula and the citizenship vision for each nation. To answer the last question regarding the civic practice of young Colombians and Chileans, this analysis relies on policy documents and news media reports. Data resulted from Spanish and English searches in major databases and news archives. The policy documents are evaluated in Spanish, and translated where necessary to improve the understanding for an English-language audience.

The analysis in this critical review relies heavily on Westheimer and Kahne’s (2004) definitions of citizenship. Using this framework, the authors assess national policy and the ICCS evaluation metrics. Additional typologies are considered in an effort to understand the goals of citizenship education according to the IEA and the respective countries in this study. Among other typologies examined are activist citizen (Isin, 2009), citizen consumer (Yuval-Davis, 2011), and multicultural citizen (Rex, 1995).

Preliminary findings indicate that the ICCS metrics do not measure certain kinds of civic engagement that are culturally relevant in Chile and Colombia. The Westheimer and Kahne framework takes into consideration the justice-oriented citizen, but the international metrics for measuring citizenship pay little attention to independent or collective actions taken by students. The authors find that recent student protests in Chile and Colombia confirm that students are not only active and passionate citizens, but concerned about their educational futures. Long traditions of political engagement and advocacy meet the standards of citizenship according to many scholars—yet the Ministries of Education are tied to curricular improvement based on testing that ignores the strengths of their students and society. In the case of Colombia, outcomes of ICCS 2009 pushed the national Ministry of Education to highlight civics and citizenship education as a priority in their country (Schulz et al., 2011).

This study questions international achievement measures in an attempt to confirm their relevance. The authors suggest that the kind of citizenship measured internationally undervalues Colombian and Chilean students’ civic engagement as this research draws attention to examples of civic participation that ICCS metrics fail to capture. The authors consider policy implications of international testing in civics and citizenship for each country under evaluation.


Similar Titles:
International Human Rights Discourse and Political Change in Chile and Colombia

Women's Political Action in the Middle East: Political and Civic Engagement and Gender and Religious Norms


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.