Citation

A Pathway for Change: Rights to the City and the Case of Long Beach, California

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Abstract:

The purpose of this study is to add to the ongoing research of “rights to the city” and “spatial justice” literature by including the case of Long Beach, California. The concept of rights to the city centers on social justice that can be achieved through greater democratic participation and control of the production of the city. Spatial justice broadens the more class-focused rights to the city to encompass a more broad-based rights agenda. Spatial justice theory posits that only through transformation of the processes of urban restructuring and development that currently reproduce injustices such as uneven development and disinvestment can we achieve social justice. Rights to the city and spatial justice both underscore the importance of place and scale in terms of power and change. While the focus of this research is limited to Long Beach, the implications are much broader. The case study of Long Beach can add to both the literature and rights to the city movements by demonstrating ways Long Beach community members have attempted to achieve the right to the city and transform it to a more spatially just urban area. Through analysis of two prominent Long Beach organizations, The Long Beach Area Citizens Involved (LBACI) and The Long Beach Coalition for Good Jobs and a Healthy Community, I hope to examine ways that community members have shifted local power dynamics and attempted to create space for all to have a more direct influence over the policies, decisions, and development that shape their city.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

citi (77), beach (59), long (59), urban (28), social (23), organ (20), communiti (20), 2013 (16), justic (16), right (16), area (15), space (15), new (14), develop (14), madden (14), state (14), spatial (14), lbaci (12), 2012 (12), chang (12), mani (12),
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Association:
Name: Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.pacificsoc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708325_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Madden, Lauren. "A Pathway for Change: Rights to the City and the Case of Long Beach, California" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708325_index.html>

APA Citation:

Madden, L. , 2014-03-27 "A Pathway for Change: Rights to the City and the Case of Long Beach, California" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708325_index.html

Publication Type: Research-in-progress presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to add to the ongoing research of “rights to the city” and “spatial justice” literature by including the case of Long Beach, California. The concept of rights to the city centers on social justice that can be achieved through greater democratic participation and control of the production of the city. Spatial justice broadens the more class-focused rights to the city to encompass a more broad-based rights agenda. Spatial justice theory posits that only through transformation of the processes of urban restructuring and development that currently reproduce injustices such as uneven development and disinvestment can we achieve social justice. Rights to the city and spatial justice both underscore the importance of place and scale in terms of power and change. While the focus of this research is limited to Long Beach, the implications are much broader. The case study of Long Beach can add to both the literature and rights to the city movements by demonstrating ways Long Beach community members have attempted to achieve the right to the city and transform it to a more spatially just urban area. Through analysis of two prominent Long Beach organizations, The Long Beach Area Citizens Involved (LBACI) and The Long Beach Coalition for Good Jobs and a Healthy Community, I hope to examine ways that community members have shifted local power dynamics and attempted to create space for all to have a more direct influence over the policies, decisions, and development that shape their city.


Similar Titles:
Commonalities and Contrasts in the Development of Major United States Urban Areas: A Spatial and Temporal Analysis from 1910 to 2000

Community Housing and Disputed Spaces: Rights, Legitimacy, and Development in the Mixed City of Yaffa

Urban Space and Social Inequality: A Spatial Analysis of Race, Class, and Sexuality in the City


 
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