Citation

Understanding teachers’ use of corporal punishment in Tanzanian schools

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Abstract:

This paper will explore possible explanations for teachers’ ongoing use of corporal punishment in Tanzanian schools in order to enhance educational strategies aimed at reducing teachers’ violent actions. I will consider the different ways in which male and female teachers come to use corporal punishment, as well as how they inflict different types of punishment based on the sex of the student. These explanations will be framed through the lens of the Capability Approach, as it helps to provide a nuanced understanding of teachers’ well-being through an analysis of the substantive freedoms (capabilities) surrounding the ‘beings and doings’ (functionings) that they have reason to value (Sen 1992; Sen 1999). The Capability Approach also acknowledges how environmental, personal and social conditions may constrain people’s capabilities. I will argue that repeated acts of violence can be viewed as a product of teachers contending with and negotiating capability constraint.
The analysis uses empirical data from three ethnographic case studies conducted at urban, peri-urban and rural Tanzanian primary schools, to demonstrate how environmental factors linked to poverty (such as overcrowded classrooms) and social conditions mediated by gender relations often constrained the capabilities that many teachers valued (such as ‘being able to help students learn’). By reframing corporal punishment in this manner, I hope to generate a more fine-grained understanding that challenges over-simplified victim-perpetrator dichotomies, and avoids blaming teachers; and instead offers more nuanced strategies that aim to reduce physical punishments in schools.
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Association:
Name: Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708915_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Tao, Sharon. "Understanding teachers’ use of corporal punishment in Tanzanian schools" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708915_index.html>

APA Citation:

Tao, S. "Understanding teachers’ use of corporal punishment in Tanzanian schools" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708915_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper will explore possible explanations for teachers’ ongoing use of corporal punishment in Tanzanian schools in order to enhance educational strategies aimed at reducing teachers’ violent actions. I will consider the different ways in which male and female teachers come to use corporal punishment, as well as how they inflict different types of punishment based on the sex of the student. These explanations will be framed through the lens of the Capability Approach, as it helps to provide a nuanced understanding of teachers’ well-being through an analysis of the substantive freedoms (capabilities) surrounding the ‘beings and doings’ (functionings) that they have reason to value (Sen 1992; Sen 1999). The Capability Approach also acknowledges how environmental, personal and social conditions may constrain people’s capabilities. I will argue that repeated acts of violence can be viewed as a product of teachers contending with and negotiating capability constraint.
The analysis uses empirical data from three ethnographic case studies conducted at urban, peri-urban and rural Tanzanian primary schools, to demonstrate how environmental factors linked to poverty (such as overcrowded classrooms) and social conditions mediated by gender relations often constrained the capabilities that many teachers valued (such as ‘being able to help students learn’). By reframing corporal punishment in this manner, I hope to generate a more fine-grained understanding that challenges over-simplified victim-perpetrator dichotomies, and avoids blaming teachers; and instead offers more nuanced strategies that aim to reduce physical punishments in schools.


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