Citation

Language Behavior among Sudanese Refugees in Israel

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This study examines the language attitudes and behaviors of Sudanese asylum seekers living in Israel and explores how these relate to the processes of language acquisition and acculturation. This research draws on the work of Culhane, whose intercultural interaction model divides language acquisition into three levels of functioning, and the work of Schumann, who argues that language learners progress along a continuum from being socially and psychologically distant to being socially and psychologically close to speakers of the target language.

Participants were nine adult male Sudanese asylum seekers participating in an intermediate-level English class in Tel Aviv. The research employed a qualitative methodology, where participants were administered a survey and participated in an oral interview. The survey contained two sections: a demographic section consisting of five closed-ended questions about participants’ backgrounds and a section focused on language use and attitudes. In addition to the survey, participants participated in an oral interview, through which the researchers attempted to determine participants’ (a) experience with studying and using various languages, (b) proficiency with those languages, (c) domains of use of those languages and (d) feelings toward those languages and the native speakers of those languages.

Our findings suggested that of the languages most commonly used by participants in Israel, Arabic, Hebrew and English, each was used and viewed differently. Although Arabic functioned as a language of education and administration in Sudan, the strong negative evaluation of the Sudanese Arab involvement in military conflicts in Sudan as well as the mistreatment of our participants in Libya, Egypt and the Sinai Desert have led to negative attitudes towards Arabic and its speakers. With respect to Hebrew, participants recognized that the language had value in Israel both economically and socially; they were also appreciative of relative physical security Israel afforded them and of their improvement in living standards. For most participants, however, their Hebrew proficiency was used primarily in the domain of work and not at an advanced level, suggesting an instrumental use. All participants gave the indication that they valued learning English more than any other language. They may have perceived learning English as a better investment than either Arabic or Hebrew as English skills would remain valuable independently of the learners’ possible deportation from Israel. Additionally, English was seen as being necessary for attaining information and professional education and was associated with the values of freedom, democracy and tolerance. Of the three languages, participants’ perceptions and behaviors with respect to English were most in-line with the potential to achieve a high level of proficiency.
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p709895_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Blake, Charles. "Language Behavior among Sudanese Refugees in Israel" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Mar 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p709895_index.html>

APA Citation:

Blake, C. C. , 2014-03-10 "Language Behavior among Sudanese Refugees in Israel" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p709895_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the language attitudes and behaviors of Sudanese asylum seekers living in Israel and explores how these relate to the processes of language acquisition and acculturation. This research draws on the work of Culhane, whose intercultural interaction model divides language acquisition into three levels of functioning, and the work of Schumann, who argues that language learners progress along a continuum from being socially and psychologically distant to being socially and psychologically close to speakers of the target language.

Participants were nine adult male Sudanese asylum seekers participating in an intermediate-level English class in Tel Aviv. The research employed a qualitative methodology, where participants were administered a survey and participated in an oral interview. The survey contained two sections: a demographic section consisting of five closed-ended questions about participants’ backgrounds and a section focused on language use and attitudes. In addition to the survey, participants participated in an oral interview, through which the researchers attempted to determine participants’ (a) experience with studying and using various languages, (b) proficiency with those languages, (c) domains of use of those languages and (d) feelings toward those languages and the native speakers of those languages.

Our findings suggested that of the languages most commonly used by participants in Israel, Arabic, Hebrew and English, each was used and viewed differently. Although Arabic functioned as a language of education and administration in Sudan, the strong negative evaluation of the Sudanese Arab involvement in military conflicts in Sudan as well as the mistreatment of our participants in Libya, Egypt and the Sinai Desert have led to negative attitudes towards Arabic and its speakers. With respect to Hebrew, participants recognized that the language had value in Israel both economically and socially; they were also appreciative of relative physical security Israel afforded them and of their improvement in living standards. For most participants, however, their Hebrew proficiency was used primarily in the domain of work and not at an advanced level, suggesting an instrumental use. All participants gave the indication that they valued learning English more than any other language. They may have perceived learning English as a better investment than either Arabic or Hebrew as English skills would remain valuable independently of the learners’ possible deportation from Israel. Additionally, English was seen as being necessary for attaining information and professional education and was associated with the values of freedom, democracy and tolerance. Of the three languages, participants’ perceptions and behaviors with respect to English were most in-line with the potential to achieve a high level of proficiency.


Similar Titles:
Collaborative Dialogue and Questions about Language among Language-minority and Language-majority Learners

Language Matters in Sex: Sexual Content in Spanish-language and English-language Fictional Narrative Television Programs Popular among Latino Adolescents

Rational Behavior or the Norm of Cooperation?: Filibustering Behavior Among Retiring Senators


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.