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Fashioning a Space in Global Hip-Hop Networks: Negotiated Identities of Female Rappers

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Abstract:

My paper for the CIES 2014 conference aims to identify and analyze the resources that young female artists use to negotiate identities and participate in the misogynistic hip-hop industry. My paper will investigate the contradictions and vulnerabilities women encounter in the now global economy and the curricular potential of this art form, as it travels within and across networks of youth and continental boundaries. While the rhyme began as a declaration for disenfranchised youth, ironically hip-hop turned into a multi-million dollar industry. The music was born in the ghettos, entered the main stream, stood up against oppression and survived to tell the stories across the world. My project questions the artistic and pedagogical force of this medium as young women across the globe continue to engage with the resources associated within the hip-hop industry, regardless of their subject positionality as females in the male dominant art form.
Hip-hop began as a means to express socially conscious political ruptures of dissident African American youth. With its mass appeal, universal messages of poverty and politics, globalization gave this urban culture of music its ticket overseas. Hip-hop flourished into a multi-national, multimodal, sub-culture that is attractive to youth around the globe. Historically, women have been mischaracterized in rap music as mere sexual objects. Regardless of this misrepresentation, female artists, myself included, continue to participate in this spectacle that breeches socio-political principles. This sub-culture of postmodernity has young women across continents foraging a space of belonging in these networks of globally connected social encounters.
My project then is designed to ask the following questions from a global perspective: is there potential for economic prosperity when, women move from the objectified subject to the creative hip-hop artist? What benefits do women get from these oppressive encounters and how do they fashion a place of belonging in the male dominated field? Pedagogically, how are young women using hip-hop as educative tools? What are they saying and how are they asserting their voice? What are the differences and similarities in voice across the globe?
Relevant research in the field includes the global impact of hip-hop, the poetics of rap, pedagogical potential and youth identity. Although these issues are being tackled, there is a gap that does not answer my questions concerning the complex interconnections between socio-economic benefits and identity marginalization of females. Among other scholars, I situate my proposed program of study along the work of: Rose, 1998; Guevara, 1987; Alim, Ibrahim and Pennycook, 2009; Hill (2009); and Dimitriadis, 2001. Trisha Rose is an early scholar on hip-hop. Her text, Black Noise (1998), is widely cited for all things hip-hop, including political and historical implications of the music. Nancy Guevara (1987) investigates the politics of women as active participants in the male dominant forums of hip-hop. Ten years later, Pough, Richardson, Durham, and Raimist (2007), compiled a hip-hop feminism anthology that provides a seminal discourse around females involved in rap music.
There have been a number of texts that look at women in hip-hop, but there is a gap that does not answer how young women across the globe are taking up hip-hop as an educative text. In an aim to better query the role of this music in education, this is where I take up my research. Primarily, this study will serve to advance knowledge of hip-hop based education with a focus on female identity and belonging. Furthermore, this research will deconstruct my own obsession with the art form as a female who resists the auspice, but contradictory to my beliefs, I am in love with hip-hop.
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Name: Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p710116_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Hudson, Audrey. "Fashioning a Space in Global Hip-Hop Networks: Negotiated Identities of Female Rappers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Mar 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p710116_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hudson, A. , 2014-03-10 "Fashioning a Space in Global Hip-Hop Networks: Negotiated Identities of Female Rappers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p710116_index.html

Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: My paper for the CIES 2014 conference aims to identify and analyze the resources that young female artists use to negotiate identities and participate in the misogynistic hip-hop industry. My paper will investigate the contradictions and vulnerabilities women encounter in the now global economy and the curricular potential of this art form, as it travels within and across networks of youth and continental boundaries. While the rhyme began as a declaration for disenfranchised youth, ironically hip-hop turned into a multi-million dollar industry. The music was born in the ghettos, entered the main stream, stood up against oppression and survived to tell the stories across the world. My project questions the artistic and pedagogical force of this medium as young women across the globe continue to engage with the resources associated within the hip-hop industry, regardless of their subject positionality as females in the male dominant art form.
Hip-hop began as a means to express socially conscious political ruptures of dissident African American youth. With its mass appeal, universal messages of poverty and politics, globalization gave this urban culture of music its ticket overseas. Hip-hop flourished into a multi-national, multimodal, sub-culture that is attractive to youth around the globe. Historically, women have been mischaracterized in rap music as mere sexual objects. Regardless of this misrepresentation, female artists, myself included, continue to participate in this spectacle that breeches socio-political principles. This sub-culture of postmodernity has young women across continents foraging a space of belonging in these networks of globally connected social encounters.
My project then is designed to ask the following questions from a global perspective: is there potential for economic prosperity when, women move from the objectified subject to the creative hip-hop artist? What benefits do women get from these oppressive encounters and how do they fashion a place of belonging in the male dominated field? Pedagogically, how are young women using hip-hop as educative tools? What are they saying and how are they asserting their voice? What are the differences and similarities in voice across the globe?
Relevant research in the field includes the global impact of hip-hop, the poetics of rap, pedagogical potential and youth identity. Although these issues are being tackled, there is a gap that does not answer my questions concerning the complex interconnections between socio-economic benefits and identity marginalization of females. Among other scholars, I situate my proposed program of study along the work of: Rose, 1998; Guevara, 1987; Alim, Ibrahim and Pennycook, 2009; Hill (2009); and Dimitriadis, 2001. Trisha Rose is an early scholar on hip-hop. Her text, Black Noise (1998), is widely cited for all things hip-hop, including political and historical implications of the music. Nancy Guevara (1987) investigates the politics of women as active participants in the male dominant forums of hip-hop. Ten years later, Pough, Richardson, Durham, and Raimist (2007), compiled a hip-hop feminism anthology that provides a seminal discourse around females involved in rap music.
There have been a number of texts that look at women in hip-hop, but there is a gap that does not answer how young women across the globe are taking up hip-hop as an educative text. In an aim to better query the role of this music in education, this is where I take up my research. Primarily, this study will serve to advance knowledge of hip-hop based education with a focus on female identity and belonging. Furthermore, this research will deconstruct my own obsession with the art form as a female who resists the auspice, but contradictory to my beliefs, I am in love with hip-hop.


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