Citation

Disasters and Information Source Repertoires: Information Seeking and Information Sufficiency in Postearthquake Haiti

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This study adopted a “repertoire” approach to interrogate how Haitians used combinations of information sources to meet information insufficiencies following the devastating 2010 earthquake. Using survey data gained in the field starting six weeks after the earthquake (N = 1,808), the study explored what demographic and structural factors predicted the number of sources used and common combinations of information sources following the earthquake. Results showed that Haitians used relatively few sources to seek information in the weeks following the earthquake. Cluster and factor analyses revealed two distinct repertoires of information sources: a “traditional” repertoire of radio, TV, church, and word of mouth; and an “elite” repertoire of newspapers, the Internet, short-message-service (SMS), billboards, and the national police. Education was the strongest predictor of using more information sources, spending more time on information seeking, and the adoption of an elite information source repertoire. Results suggested that greater reliance on a traditional repertoire led to decreased information sufficiency. Implications for practice are specifically directed at international development and aid organizations in planning post-disaster information provision efforts.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

iolenc (1), isorde (1), argeting churche (1), ecover (1), exua (1), idesprea (1), olv (1), roblem (1), ace (1), fforts (1), GO (1), urthe (1), everage (1), o empowe (1), larke (1), uch partnerships (1), nd developmen (1), artnerin (1), eligiou (1), olic (1), bilit (1),
Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p711261_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Sommerfeldt, Erich. "Disasters and Information Source Repertoires: Information Seeking and Information Sufficiency in Postearthquake Haiti" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2018-09-06 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p711261_index.html>

APA Citation:

Sommerfeldt, E. J. , 2014-05-21 "Disasters and Information Source Repertoires: Information Seeking and Information Sufficiency in Postearthquake Haiti" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-06 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p711261_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study adopted a “repertoire” approach to interrogate how Haitians used combinations of information sources to meet information insufficiencies following the devastating 2010 earthquake. Using survey data gained in the field starting six weeks after the earthquake (N = 1,808), the study explored what demographic and structural factors predicted the number of sources used and common combinations of information sources following the earthquake. Results showed that Haitians used relatively few sources to seek information in the weeks following the earthquake. Cluster and factor analyses revealed two distinct repertoires of information sources: a “traditional” repertoire of radio, TV, church, and word of mouth; and an “elite” repertoire of newspapers, the Internet, short-message-service (SMS), billboards, and the national police. Education was the strongest predictor of using more information sources, spending more time on information seeking, and the adoption of an elite information source repertoire. Results suggested that greater reliance on a traditional repertoire led to decreased information sufficiency. Implications for practice are specifically directed at international development and aid organizations in planning post-disaster information provision efforts.


Similar Titles:
The Oakland Larks of the West Coast Baseball Association: The Negro Leagues Move West

Stress Accumulation and Substance Use isorder among Older Adults


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.