Citation

Is the Third-Person Effect Real?: A Critical Examination of the Effect of the Third-Person Perception on Censorship Attitudes

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

The theoretical rationale and testing methods for the behavioral hypothesis of the third-person effect were examined. The mathematical relationships among four different statistical models were analyzed. The average effects of the third-person perception, presumed media effect on others, and perceived media effect on self were estimated for 14 previous studies (Study 1, the total N = 5,253). Study 2 conducted a meta-regression analysis for Schmierbach, Boyle, Xu, and McLeod’s (2011) correlational data. The results of the analyses showed that previously used methods have critical limitations. The average effect of DME on support for censorship was found to be insignificant and highly inconsistent. The average effect of PME3 on support for censorship was found to be greatest and most consistent. Theoretical and methodological implications of the findings were discussed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

effect (245), pme1 (187), model (157), dme (146), pme3 (144), studi (130), censorship (119), coeffici (94), attitud (83), behavior (82), hypothesi (78), person (76), al (73), third (73), et (73), test (72), third-person (70), media (60), regress (60), 3 (50), use (49),
Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714140_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Chung, Sungeun., Moon, Shinil. and Jeong, Da Eun. "Is the Third-Person Effect Real?: A Critical Examination of the Effect of the Third-Person Perception on Censorship Attitudes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2018-09-06 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714140_index.html>

APA Citation:

Chung, S. , Moon, S. and Jeong, D. , 2014-05-21 "Is the Third-Person Effect Real?: A Critical Examination of the Effect of the Third-Person Perception on Censorship Attitudes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-06 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714140_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The theoretical rationale and testing methods for the behavioral hypothesis of the third-person effect were examined. The mathematical relationships among four different statistical models were analyzed. The average effects of the third-person perception, presumed media effect on others, and perceived media effect on self were estimated for 14 previous studies (Study 1, the total N = 5,253). Study 2 conducted a meta-regression analysis for Schmierbach, Boyle, Xu, and McLeod’s (2011) correlational data. The results of the analyses showed that previously used methods have critical limitations. The average effect of DME on support for censorship was found to be insignificant and highly inconsistent. The average effect of PME3 on support for censorship was found to be greatest and most consistent. Theoretical and methodological implications of the findings were discussed.


Similar Titles:
A Social Judgmental Model of the Third-Person Perception Hypothesis: Focusing on the Effect of Pre-Existing Attitudes, the Level of Knowledge, and Message Strength on Judgments on Media Impact


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.