Citation

The Impulsive Appeal of Social Network Sites (SNS): Automatic Affective Reactions to SNS-Cues

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Abstract:

Why do people sometimes give into their desires to use social network sites (SNS) despite their willingness to resist them? Dual-systems models of social behavior suggest that automatic affective reactions to SNS-cues (e.g., Facebook logo) may trigger impulses to use SNS. We investigated this reasoning among Facebook-users in two studies (N=72 and N=128). Facebook-users completed the Affect Misattribution Procedure (Payne et al., 2005), which captured their immediate, automatic affective reactions to Facebook and control cues (pictures; e.g., Facebook-logo). Afterwards, Facebook-use and habit were assessed using a questionnaire. Results revealed that frequent and habitual Facebook-users showed more favorable affective reactions to Facebook-cues than control cues, while occasional and non-habitual Facebook-users’ affective reactions did not differ as a function of cue-type. Moreover, automatic affective reactions to Facebook-cues were meaningfully related to self-reported cravings to use Facebook (Study 2). Our findings provide novel insights into the impulsive aspects of SNS-use.
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Association:
Name: International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714236_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Van Koningsbruggen, Guido. and Veling, Harm. "The Impulsive Appeal of Social Network Sites (SNS): Automatic Affective Reactions to SNS-Cues" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, <Not Available>. 2018-09-06 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714236_index.html>

APA Citation:

Van Koningsbruggen, G. M. and Veling, H. "The Impulsive Appeal of Social Network Sites (SNS): Automatic Affective Reactions to SNS-Cues" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington <Not Available>. 2018-09-06 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714236_index.html

Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Why do people sometimes give into their desires to use social network sites (SNS) despite their willingness to resist them? Dual-systems models of social behavior suggest that automatic affective reactions to SNS-cues (e.g., Facebook logo) may trigger impulses to use SNS. We investigated this reasoning among Facebook-users in two studies (N=72 and N=128). Facebook-users completed the Affect Misattribution Procedure (Payne et al., 2005), which captured their immediate, automatic affective reactions to Facebook and control cues (pictures; e.g., Facebook-logo). Afterwards, Facebook-use and habit were assessed using a questionnaire. Results revealed that frequent and habitual Facebook-users showed more favorable affective reactions to Facebook-cues than control cues, while occasional and non-habitual Facebook-users’ affective reactions did not differ as a function of cue-type. Moreover, automatic affective reactions to Facebook-cues were meaningfully related to self-reported cravings to use Facebook (Study 2). Our findings provide novel insights into the impulsive aspects of SNS-use.


 
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