Citation

Oh Canada! Construction and Experience of Citizenship

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Abstract:

Objectives or purposes of the paper.
In this paper, we use our experience of driving from Toronto, ON to Victoria, BC as an opportunity to explore the construction of citizenship and its relation to cultural production through our different entry points to this nation state. As three graduate students with different backgrounds and relationships to the institutional legitimacy of citizenship, this drive lent itself to a rich exploration of how citizenship gets constructed around us, through us and about us. Following Goldring & Landolt (2013), we attempt to explore a multilayered notion of citizenship that is necessarily connected to the “institutional production” of legitimacy and illegitimacy.

Main perspective or theoretical/conceptual framework used.
We mobilize several bodies of literature to make sense out of our experiences and connect them to the larger conversations around not only citizenship but subjectivity and representation. Using Stuart Hall’s politics of representation (1997), we situate our experience with the representation of black masculinity, particularly with the media representations of black men and the perpetuation of these stereotypes.
Awad Ibrahims’s notion of the Social Imaginary (Ibrahim, 2004) helps us understand and situate ourselves within the hegemonic discursive space in which we are all “already imagined, constructed, and thus treated as “Black” by hegemonic discourses and groups, respectively” (p.78). This is particularly poignant as we traverse not only geographic borders, but social and discursive ones through our cross-continental journey together as Black/Brown/White bodies.
Landolt & Goldring’s (2013) work around the social production and negotiation of citizenship and legality also help us understand the material and institutionalization of legitimacy and illegitimacy. Particularly, the way certain bodies are positioned as already-always legitimate and others illegitimate within the social imaginary of Canada.

Analytical methods, research design, or modes of inquiry.
We use an autoethnographic methodological approach (Chang, 2008; Ellis, Adams and Bochner, 2011); beginning with understanding our own identifications. We mobilize this approach teamed with our theoretical underpinnings as a way to disrupt the norms of academic writing, to potentially treat “research as a political, socially-just and socially-conscious act” (p. 1). We aspire to legitimize other ways of knowing that are not European white, masculine, heterosexual, middle/class, Christian and able-bodied experiences. Lastly, we seek to validate and acknowledge the multiple ways we know and learn passed down through generations. Within this paper, we engage how our identifications as three graduate students -- white Canadian woman, a Black Canadian man, and a Latina American immigrant seeking permanent residency in Canada -- experience how we experience a cross Canada road trip dipping in and out of the American border.

Data sources or evidence.
To investigate and analyse our lived experience throughout this journey we relied on several firsthand accounts. We kept journals, photographs and notes as we travelled. Once back from the trip, we sat around the kitchen table of one of the graduate students and collaborated on a digital recording, retelling the trip in great detail including our reflections. We used this recording to deconstructed and further analysed and shared our thinking on the experience.

Results and/or conclusions.
In this work in progress, we contend that the construction of citizenship even in a country that touts a “multicultural” foundation, continues to be shaped by a dominant conception of a white, middle class, heterosexual subject. Our different entry points into this multiculturalist discourse allow us for a deep exploration of the nuances and critiques that can be leveled around this construction of citizenship.

Significance of the study to the field of comparative or international education.
This paper adds to the field of comparative and international education on four interconnected fronts. Firstly, the framing of racial identities within the Canadian context of multiculturalism will be deconstructed, challenged and represented through the lens of the subjects lived realities, privilege and cultural production. Secondly, we will speak to race and notions of transverse borders within the framework of the social imaginary. Thirdly, though there continue to be similarities within social race-based issues in both the United States and Canada, the discourse surrounding the framing of race and race relations are much different. We wish to connect this to the assumption of the ‘all’ subject in “education for all” and complicate this discourse.
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Association:
Name: Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference
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http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p717816_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Arraiz Matute, Alexandra., Nicholls, Rachael. and Tabi, Emmanuel. "Oh Canada! Construction and Experience of Citizenship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Mar 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p717816_index.html>

APA Citation:

Arraiz Matute, A. , Nicholls, R. and Tabi, E. , 2014-03-10 "Oh Canada! Construction and Experience of Citizenship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p717816_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Objectives or purposes of the paper.
In this paper, we use our experience of driving from Toronto, ON to Victoria, BC as an opportunity to explore the construction of citizenship and its relation to cultural production through our different entry points to this nation state. As three graduate students with different backgrounds and relationships to the institutional legitimacy of citizenship, this drive lent itself to a rich exploration of how citizenship gets constructed around us, through us and about us. Following Goldring & Landolt (2013), we attempt to explore a multilayered notion of citizenship that is necessarily connected to the “institutional production” of legitimacy and illegitimacy.

Main perspective or theoretical/conceptual framework used.
We mobilize several bodies of literature to make sense out of our experiences and connect them to the larger conversations around not only citizenship but subjectivity and representation. Using Stuart Hall’s politics of representation (1997), we situate our experience with the representation of black masculinity, particularly with the media representations of black men and the perpetuation of these stereotypes.
Awad Ibrahims’s notion of the Social Imaginary (Ibrahim, 2004) helps us understand and situate ourselves within the hegemonic discursive space in which we are all “already imagined, constructed, and thus treated as “Black” by hegemonic discourses and groups, respectively” (p.78). This is particularly poignant as we traverse not only geographic borders, but social and discursive ones through our cross-continental journey together as Black/Brown/White bodies.
Landolt & Goldring’s (2013) work around the social production and negotiation of citizenship and legality also help us understand the material and institutionalization of legitimacy and illegitimacy. Particularly, the way certain bodies are positioned as already-always legitimate and others illegitimate within the social imaginary of Canada.

Analytical methods, research design, or modes of inquiry.
We use an autoethnographic methodological approach (Chang, 2008; Ellis, Adams and Bochner, 2011); beginning with understanding our own identifications. We mobilize this approach teamed with our theoretical underpinnings as a way to disrupt the norms of academic writing, to potentially treat “research as a political, socially-just and socially-conscious act” (p. 1). We aspire to legitimize other ways of knowing that are not European white, masculine, heterosexual, middle/class, Christian and able-bodied experiences. Lastly, we seek to validate and acknowledge the multiple ways we know and learn passed down through generations. Within this paper, we engage how our identifications as three graduate students -- white Canadian woman, a Black Canadian man, and a Latina American immigrant seeking permanent residency in Canada -- experience how we experience a cross Canada road trip dipping in and out of the American border.

Data sources or evidence.
To investigate and analyse our lived experience throughout this journey we relied on several firsthand accounts. We kept journals, photographs and notes as we travelled. Once back from the trip, we sat around the kitchen table of one of the graduate students and collaborated on a digital recording, retelling the trip in great detail including our reflections. We used this recording to deconstructed and further analysed and shared our thinking on the experience.

Results and/or conclusions.
In this work in progress, we contend that the construction of citizenship even in a country that touts a “multicultural” foundation, continues to be shaped by a dominant conception of a white, middle class, heterosexual subject. Our different entry points into this multiculturalist discourse allow us for a deep exploration of the nuances and critiques that can be leveled around this construction of citizenship.

Significance of the study to the field of comparative or international education.
This paper adds to the field of comparative and international education on four interconnected fronts. Firstly, the framing of racial identities within the Canadian context of multiculturalism will be deconstructed, challenged and represented through the lens of the subjects lived realities, privilege and cultural production. Secondly, we will speak to race and notions of transverse borders within the framework of the social imaginary. Thirdly, though there continue to be similarities within social race-based issues in both the United States and Canada, the discourse surrounding the framing of race and race relations are much different. We wish to connect this to the assumption of the ‘all’ subject in “education for all” and complicate this discourse.


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An Experiment in Democracy: Constructing Migrant Citizenship Inside the Federal Labor Camp Program, 1935-1946

From Genetic to Economic Nationalization; Immigration and Citizenship Policies as Historical Forms of Boundary Construction and Maintenance. The Cases of Australia and Canada.


 
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