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Gauging the influence of indigenous lives on education in the global south and Education For All (EFA) goals:Ghana, Nigeria, & Indonesia

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Abstract:

This paper focuses on the notion that the lives and practices of indigenous people have contributed to the marginalization of school children in some rural areas of the underdeveloped world. According to a 2005 report from a workshop conducted by United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous people in Brisbane Australia, the issue of indigenous people remains crucial and needed to be address among scholars. The report also recommended the need for a partnership between the local people, governments, and civil society to create a thriving society. Several countries continue to neglect the role and practices of indigenous people and its impact on areas like education, economic development, and social lives. A UNESCO report estimated that there are 370 million indigenous people in the world; this represents approximately 5 per cent of the total world population. The same UNESCO report shed more light on the serious discrimination and struggles that indigenous people face in terms of access to basic social services including education. The demands of closing the gap of indigenous people is intended to fulfill the post 2015 Education for All (EFA) agenda.

This study uses cross-national analysis of three countries in the Global South: Ghana, Indonesia, and Nigeria. These three countries have significant number of indigenous population. They are also participating countries that has been targeted to achieve the EFA goals. With the use of the existing data and literature review, we intend to seek the factors why the lives and practices of the indigenous people have not been taken into consideration in these three countries. We will also access whether this neglect contributes to the poor education standards and lack of quality education. Roy, Hosain, and Guhuthakurta (2007) asserted that indigenous people are marginalized by the state’s non-recognition of their cultural distinctiveness. However, the study of marginalization of indigenous groups has received less attention among scholars and policy makers. This paper will look at variety of factors including communal social practices that influence access and participation in relation to EFA goals.
Most indigenous people are found in the rural areas of the Global South and around the world. They practice communal activities such as festivals, funerals, wedding, naming ceremonies, market days, and other traditional practices during school hours. These activities often affect the students’ participation in school thereby hindering their performances and the quality of education they obtain. Are there any similarities and differences in the factors influencing the education quality of indigenous people in Ghana, Indonesia and Nigeria? Do communal social practices impact educational participation and affect how indigenous people obtain education in these three developing countries? Our hypothesis is that there are several similarities among the three countries on the factors influencing the education quality; and there is a significant impact of the communal social activities on the educational participation and access for this group of people. We will conclude this paper seeking answers and recommendations on how policy formulation can mitigate the indigenous problem and its influence on education in these three global south countries.
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Name: Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference
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http://www.cies.us


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MLA Citation:

Idris, Abubakar., Ginanto, Dion. and Osafo, E. "Gauging the influence of indigenous lives on education in the global south and Education For All (EFA) goals:Ghana, Nigeria, & Indonesia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Mar 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p718297_index.html>

APA Citation:

Idris, A. , Ginanto, D. E. and Osafo, E. K. , 2014-03-10 "Gauging the influence of indigenous lives on education in the global south and Education For All (EFA) goals:Ghana, Nigeria, & Indonesia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p718297_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper focuses on the notion that the lives and practices of indigenous people have contributed to the marginalization of school children in some rural areas of the underdeveloped world. According to a 2005 report from a workshop conducted by United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous people in Brisbane Australia, the issue of indigenous people remains crucial and needed to be address among scholars. The report also recommended the need for a partnership between the local people, governments, and civil society to create a thriving society. Several countries continue to neglect the role and practices of indigenous people and its impact on areas like education, economic development, and social lives. A UNESCO report estimated that there are 370 million indigenous people in the world; this represents approximately 5 per cent of the total world population. The same UNESCO report shed more light on the serious discrimination and struggles that indigenous people face in terms of access to basic social services including education. The demands of closing the gap of indigenous people is intended to fulfill the post 2015 Education for All (EFA) agenda.

This study uses cross-national analysis of three countries in the Global South: Ghana, Indonesia, and Nigeria. These three countries have significant number of indigenous population. They are also participating countries that has been targeted to achieve the EFA goals. With the use of the existing data and literature review, we intend to seek the factors why the lives and practices of the indigenous people have not been taken into consideration in these three countries. We will also access whether this neglect contributes to the poor education standards and lack of quality education. Roy, Hosain, and Guhuthakurta (2007) asserted that indigenous people are marginalized by the state’s non-recognition of their cultural distinctiveness. However, the study of marginalization of indigenous groups has received less attention among scholars and policy makers. This paper will look at variety of factors including communal social practices that influence access and participation in relation to EFA goals.
Most indigenous people are found in the rural areas of the Global South and around the world. They practice communal activities such as festivals, funerals, wedding, naming ceremonies, market days, and other traditional practices during school hours. These activities often affect the students’ participation in school thereby hindering their performances and the quality of education they obtain. Are there any similarities and differences in the factors influencing the education quality of indigenous people in Ghana, Indonesia and Nigeria? Do communal social practices impact educational participation and affect how indigenous people obtain education in these three developing countries? Our hypothesis is that there are several similarities among the three countries on the factors influencing the education quality; and there is a significant impact of the communal social activities on the educational participation and access for this group of people. We will conclude this paper seeking answers and recommendations on how policy formulation can mitigate the indigenous problem and its influence on education in these three global south countries.


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