Citation

Re-visioning the standards process: Negotiating issues of international standards, national expectations and the state of literacy learning in the DRC

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

The USAID-funded PIEQ (Package for Improving Education Quality) in the Democratic Republic of Congo has initiated a series of workshops to improve Ministry of Education capacity for developing standards, curricula, assessment, and other tools for education in reading and writing. These efforts have been met with marked enthusiasm by Ministry of Education participants. Additionally, the workshops have created opportunies for participants to learn about language use, learners’ needs, and what tools are required to improve the quality of literacy learning in the DRC. The initiative to establish standards for both content and performance in reading have generated a good deal of debate as well, particularly about how high to set expectations for learners. In this respect, international reform pressures are brought to bear as historically-strong notions of a well-educated DRC society run up against current realities of modest performance in reading, as measured via recent reading evaluations. EGRA (Early Grades Reading Assessment) testing conducted by the project in 2010 and 2012 have shows weaknesses across reading domains among participating students. How do these outcomes affect MoE efforts to align performance standards with international benchmarks? In what ways might national aspirations to rebuild the DRC education system shape the future of reading education? The proposed paper addresses these questions while describing and explaining the efforts, challenges, and lessons learned through the standards-setting process in the DRC. To achieve this end, the paper draws upon a number of data sources, including observations and documents produced during the series of workshops organized by the project, the MoE, and other partners. Of particular interest is the interplay between international trends to establish high standards and local (i.e., national) realities of student performance. The paper concludes that, although the standards process in the DRC has tended to reach unrealistic goals, it is a necessary step to defining the parameters of reform. The paper provides recommendations for organizing the standards-setting process in similar development contexts, in which the need to provide future results can enhance rather than hamper efforts to build stakeholders’ capacity for improving literacy education.
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p719141_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Simard, Suzanne. "Re-visioning the standards process: Negotiating issues of international standards, national expectations and the state of literacy learning in the DRC" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p719141_index.html>

APA Citation:

Simard, S. "Re-visioning the standards process: Negotiating issues of international standards, national expectations and the state of literacy learning in the DRC" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p719141_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The USAID-funded PIEQ (Package for Improving Education Quality) in the Democratic Republic of Congo has initiated a series of workshops to improve Ministry of Education capacity for developing standards, curricula, assessment, and other tools for education in reading and writing. These efforts have been met with marked enthusiasm by Ministry of Education participants. Additionally, the workshops have created opportunies for participants to learn about language use, learners’ needs, and what tools are required to improve the quality of literacy learning in the DRC. The initiative to establish standards for both content and performance in reading have generated a good deal of debate as well, particularly about how high to set expectations for learners. In this respect, international reform pressures are brought to bear as historically-strong notions of a well-educated DRC society run up against current realities of modest performance in reading, as measured via recent reading evaluations. EGRA (Early Grades Reading Assessment) testing conducted by the project in 2010 and 2012 have shows weaknesses across reading domains among participating students. How do these outcomes affect MoE efforts to align performance standards with international benchmarks? In what ways might national aspirations to rebuild the DRC education system shape the future of reading education? The proposed paper addresses these questions while describing and explaining the efforts, challenges, and lessons learned through the standards-setting process in the DRC. To achieve this end, the paper draws upon a number of data sources, including observations and documents produced during the series of workshops organized by the project, the MoE, and other partners. Of particular interest is the interplay between international trends to establish high standards and local (i.e., national) realities of student performance. The paper concludes that, although the standards process in the DRC has tended to reach unrealistic goals, it is a necessary step to defining the parameters of reform. The paper provides recommendations for organizing the standards-setting process in similar development contexts, in which the need to provide future results can enhance rather than hamper efforts to build stakeholders’ capacity for improving literacy education.


Similar Titles:
Finding New Forms of Governance: International Immigration, the Nation-State and Issues of Nation Building in Spain

Bricolage or Fidelity: How Elementary Interning Teachers' Negotiate Curriculum, Professional Learning, and Local Contexts in Learning to Teach Literacy


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.