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From Concerted Cultivation to College: How Parenting Practices Shape Postsecondary Success

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Abstract:

Prior research indicates that parenting practices play an important role in facilitating children’s educational success. However, this research has focused largely on elementary and middle school children, when parental influences are likely to be the strongest. In this study, we examine how parenting practices during high school are related to successful transition into postsecondary education and bachelor’s degree completion. Moreover, we examine whether parenting practices are converted into academic capital during high school, which in turn helps to facilitate postsecondary success, or whether parenting practices continue to have an independent role in these later educational transitions. Results based on the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) indicate that parenting practices help to explain a substantial portion of the class gaps in successful transitions into postsecondary education as well as bachelor’s degree completion. Moreover, while some parenting practices are fully mediated by academic capital, others are not. Although different dimensions of parenting are presumed to reflect an underlying concept of concerted cultivation (and more broadly cultural capital), our findings indicate that perhaps not all parenting practices exert their influence in the same way, which deserves careful attention in future research.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

parent (223), educ (189), student (135), school (123), enrol (98), postsecondari (93), academ (92), class (90), complet (89), practic (88), year (84), high (83), model (80), time (78), capit (76), 1 (73), colleg (72), b (70), institut (68), social (66), d (59),
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.asanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p723138_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Potter, Daniel. and Roksa, Josipa. "From Concerted Cultivation to College: How Parenting Practices Shape Postsecondary Success" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 <Not Available>. 2016-06-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p723138_index.html>

APA Citation:

Potter, D. J. and Roksa, J. , 2014-08-15 "From Concerted Cultivation to College: How Parenting Practices Shape Postsecondary Success" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2016-06-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p723138_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Prior research indicates that parenting practices play an important role in facilitating children’s educational success. However, this research has focused largely on elementary and middle school children, when parental influences are likely to be the strongest. In this study, we examine how parenting practices during high school are related to successful transition into postsecondary education and bachelor’s degree completion. Moreover, we examine whether parenting practices are converted into academic capital during high school, which in turn helps to facilitate postsecondary success, or whether parenting practices continue to have an independent role in these later educational transitions. Results based on the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS:2002) indicate that parenting practices help to explain a substantial portion of the class gaps in successful transitions into postsecondary education as well as bachelor’s degree completion. Moreover, while some parenting practices are fully mediated by academic capital, others are not. Although different dimensions of parenting are presumed to reflect an underlying concept of concerted cultivation (and more broadly cultural capital), our findings indicate that perhaps not all parenting practices exert their influence in the same way, which deserves careful attention in future research.


Similar Titles:
Parental Social Class, Childhood Time Use Patterns, the Likelihood of High School and College Completion

Social Media and First-Generation High School Students’ College Aspirations: A Social Capital Lens


 
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