Citation

Race, Place, and Job Leads Received through Networks: The Role of Diversity in Urban Contexts

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Abstract:

How is racial diversity of place and occupation associated with access to informal job finding assistance? We rely on survey data on the receipt of unsolicited job leads in the 24 largest cities in the United States, which have been linked to Census data on urban diversity as well as EEO-1 reports on occupational race composition from employers. The results from logistic regression analyses suggest that diversity per se is not associated with informal access to job leads, but particularistic forms of diversity are. At the city level, access to job leads for Latina/os is greatest in Latina/o cities—consistent with research on Latina/o enclaves. At the occupation level, access to job leads decreases as the percentage of non-whites in urban occupational settings increases—consistent predictions from social closure theory. The findings therefore reveal how network-based information exchange is embedded in and perhaps influenced by the race context of cities and occupational fields.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

job (157), citi (119), occup (97), divers (92), social (82), lead (72), racial (70), race (66), group (65), inform (60), network (56), find (51), percent (47), black (40), employ (38), city-occup (38), access (38), 1 (37), level (37), white (36), relat (33),
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.asanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p723782_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Hamm, Lindsay., McDonald, Steve. and Elliott, James. "Race, Place, and Job Leads Received through Networks: The Role of Diversity in Urban Contexts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 <Not Available>. 2016-06-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p723782_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hamm, L. , McDonald, S. and Elliott, J. R. , 2014-08-15 "Race, Place, and Job Leads Received through Networks: The Role of Diversity in Urban Contexts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Online <PDF>. 2016-06-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p723782_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: How is racial diversity of place and occupation associated with access to informal job finding assistance? We rely on survey data on the receipt of unsolicited job leads in the 24 largest cities in the United States, which have been linked to Census data on urban diversity as well as EEO-1 reports on occupational race composition from employers. The results from logistic regression analyses suggest that diversity per se is not associated with informal access to job leads, but particularistic forms of diversity are. At the city level, access to job leads for Latina/os is greatest in Latina/o cities—consistent with research on Latina/o enclaves. At the occupation level, access to job leads decreases as the percentage of non-whites in urban occupational settings increases—consistent predictions from social closure theory. The findings therefore reveal how network-based information exchange is embedded in and perhaps influenced by the race context of cities and occupational fields.


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