Citation

You Get What You Give, or Do You? An Examination of Resource Sharing among Entrepreneurs

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Abstract:

This paper enhances our understanding of differential benefits to actors from social ties by examining an understudied step in the process, namely social capital generation. Most extant research has found that women receive fewer and less valuable benefits from using their social ties in the labor market. These studies infer that gender differences in benefits are the result of women being embedded in the wrong social networks. Implicit in these arguments is that if women had access to the same social ties as their male counterparts observed gender differences in benefits would be attenuated. However, this proposition has not been tested directly. Given that the benefits of social ties are contingent on an actor’s ability to mobilize the resources possessed by alters (e.g. Smith 2005, 2007; Marin 2011), or social capital generation, a complete theory of gender differences in social capital must consider whether men and women differ in their ability to garner resources from alters. This paper uses a unique setting where male and female entrepreneurs have the same opportunity to network to test this proposition. This study finds that while women receive fewer resources than men, this difference is 1) moderated when men and women in the same occupation are compared, and 2) mediated (in some cases completely) when men and women making the same contributions of resources to the network are compared. These findings suggest that gender alone does not explain differences in the relative benefits actors receive from social ties.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

status (159), characterist (115), network (114), actor (96), resourc (96), social (76), gender (75), femal (70), member (67), referr (53), local (50), alter (50), receiv (49), 1 (48), entrepreneur (48), group (46), differ (46), tie (41), effect (40), male (40), studi (34),
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725410_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Abraham, Mabel. "You Get What You Give, or Do You? An Examination of Resource Sharing among Entrepreneurs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 <Not Available>. 2016-06-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725410_index.html>

APA Citation:

Abraham, M. , 2014-08-15 "You Get What You Give, or Do You? An Examination of Resource Sharing among Entrepreneurs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2016-06-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725410_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper enhances our understanding of differential benefits to actors from social ties by examining an understudied step in the process, namely social capital generation. Most extant research has found that women receive fewer and less valuable benefits from using their social ties in the labor market. These studies infer that gender differences in benefits are the result of women being embedded in the wrong social networks. Implicit in these arguments is that if women had access to the same social ties as their male counterparts observed gender differences in benefits would be attenuated. However, this proposition has not been tested directly. Given that the benefits of social ties are contingent on an actor’s ability to mobilize the resources possessed by alters (e.g. Smith 2005, 2007; Marin 2011), or social capital generation, a complete theory of gender differences in social capital must consider whether men and women differ in their ability to garner resources from alters. This paper uses a unique setting where male and female entrepreneurs have the same opportunity to network to test this proposition. This study finds that while women receive fewer resources than men, this difference is 1) moderated when men and women in the same occupation are compared, and 2) mediated (in some cases completely) when men and women making the same contributions of resources to the network are compared. These findings suggest that gender alone does not explain differences in the relative benefits actors receive from social ties.


Similar Titles:
Gender Differences in the Effects of Social Networks on Reentry Outcomes

Romeo or Juliet?: Gender differences in social disorganization effects on female and male suicide and homicide patterns

Gender, Community Resources, and Disadvantage: Do Community Resources Have a Differential Effect on Reconviction for Females and Males who Return to Disadvantaged Communities?


 
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