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Analyzing Deaf-hearing alliances: Lessons from feminist methodology

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Abstract:

Feminist methodologists in psychology and other disciplines have encouraged, among other practices, self-reflexivity, accountability, attention to intersectionality, and an analysis of power and privilege when conducting research (e.g., Hurtado, 2010). Feminist scholars in disability studies have argued for the importance of attending to and navigating the tricky balance between when social group identity matters and when it does not (e.g., Brueggemann, Garland-Thomson, & Kleege, 2005); a parallel argument has been raised among Black feminist writers and activists (e.g., Luna & Ross, 2006; Parker, 1990). Building on previous work in which my colleagues and I used principles of feminist methodology to analyze our work on alliances across differences of identity (Ostrove, Cole, & Oliva, 2009), this presentation will report on data from two focus groups of Deaf women who were asked to reflect on their relationships with hearing people. In our earlier work, we noted the ways in which the principles of feminist methodology reviewed above can also apply to the process of building alliances across differences of identity. The current presentation will help us examine ways in which the qualities that make for effective feminist research - and effective alliances across differences of identity - are evident in discussions of Deaf women’s relationships with hearing people. The following questions will guide our analysis of the focus group data: How do the women in the focus groups discuss ways in which hearing people are 1) aware of their own identities (or not); 2) sensitive to or thoughtful about Deaf people’s identit(ies), culture, or communication needs; 3) willing (or not) to relinquish their own power/privilege? In the context of sharing these research findings, we will also reflect on the ways in which our own identities, and issues of power and privilege, mattered during the research process itself (see also Ostrove & Oliva, 2010).
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Name: National Association for Women in Psychology Conference
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http://awpsych.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p728541_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Ostrove, Joan. and Oliva, Gina. "Analyzing Deaf-hearing alliances: Lessons from feminist methodology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association for Women in Psychology Conference, Renaissance Columbus Downtown Hotel, Columbus, Ohio, <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p728541_index.html>

APA Citation:

Ostrove, J. M. and Oliva, G. A. "Analyzing Deaf-hearing alliances: Lessons from feminist methodology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association for Women in Psychology Conference, Renaissance Columbus Downtown Hotel, Columbus, Ohio <Not Available>. 2014-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p728541_index.html

Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: Feminist methodologists in psychology and other disciplines have encouraged, among other practices, self-reflexivity, accountability, attention to intersectionality, and an analysis of power and privilege when conducting research (e.g., Hurtado, 2010). Feminist scholars in disability studies have argued for the importance of attending to and navigating the tricky balance between when social group identity matters and when it does not (e.g., Brueggemann, Garland-Thomson, & Kleege, 2005); a parallel argument has been raised among Black feminist writers and activists (e.g., Luna & Ross, 2006; Parker, 1990). Building on previous work in which my colleagues and I used principles of feminist methodology to analyze our work on alliances across differences of identity (Ostrove, Cole, & Oliva, 2009), this presentation will report on data from two focus groups of Deaf women who were asked to reflect on their relationships with hearing people. In our earlier work, we noted the ways in which the principles of feminist methodology reviewed above can also apply to the process of building alliances across differences of identity. The current presentation will help us examine ways in which the qualities that make for effective feminist research - and effective alliances across differences of identity - are evident in discussions of Deaf women’s relationships with hearing people. The following questions will guide our analysis of the focus group data: How do the women in the focus groups discuss ways in which hearing people are 1) aware of their own identities (or not); 2) sensitive to or thoughtful about Deaf people’s identit(ies), culture, or communication needs; 3) willing (or not) to relinquish their own power/privilege? In the context of sharing these research findings, we will also reflect on the ways in which our own identities, and issues of power and privilege, mattered during the research process itself (see also Ostrove & Oliva, 2010).


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