Citation

The Effect of “Headless Fatties” vs. Whole Beings in Obesity Health Campaign Imagery

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Recent campaigns with text and images depicting obesity as the effect of individual behaviors sparked concern that an emphasis on individual determinants may lead to stigmatization of overweight or obese people. In this 3 x 2 experiment (n = 252), we sought to determine whether stigmatizing images and text led to differences in antifat attitudes and health-related behavioral intentions, and whether effects were moderated by weight status. We found that stigmatizing images in particular prompted significant differences in negative attitudes toward overweight individuals and also in behavioral intentions to increase healthy behavior or to limit unhealthy behavior. Our results demonstrate that stigmatizing images might be effective at stigmatizing the behaviors that lead to obesity, but an intended consequence of these images is that they also contribute to stigma experienced by overweight people, which results in social and emotional harm.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

imag (153), obes (130), stigmat (106), weight (100), behavior (100), individu (86), attitud (83), overweight (78), stigma (63), text (61), health (56), effect (54), particip (50), peopl (44), social (43), m (43), antifat (42), messag (41), toward (39), normal (35), p (34),
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Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p744668_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Young, Rachel., Subramanian, Roma. and Hinnant, Amanda. "The Effect of “Headless Fatties” vs. Whole Beings in Obesity Health Campaign Imagery" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Le Centre Sheraton, Montreal, Canada, Aug 06, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p744668_index.html>

APA Citation:

Young, R. , Subramanian, R. and Hinnant, A. , 2014-08-06 "The Effect of “Headless Fatties” vs. Whole Beings in Obesity Health Campaign Imagery" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Le Centre Sheraton, Montreal, Canada Online <PDF>. 2014-12-19 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p744668_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent campaigns with text and images depicting obesity as the effect of individual behaviors sparked concern that an emphasis on individual determinants may lead to stigmatization of overweight or obese people. In this 3 x 2 experiment (n = 252), we sought to determine whether stigmatizing images and text led to differences in antifat attitudes and health-related behavioral intentions, and whether effects were moderated by weight status. We found that stigmatizing images in particular prompted significant differences in negative attitudes toward overweight individuals and also in behavioral intentions to increase healthy behavior or to limit unhealthy behavior. Our results demonstrate that stigmatizing images might be effective at stigmatizing the behaviors that lead to obesity, but an intended consequence of these images is that they also contribute to stigma experienced by overweight people, which results in social and emotional harm.


Similar Titles:
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