Citation

Media Choice as a Function of Prior Affect: An Attempt to Separate Mood from Emotion

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Media choices were compared in three studies, observed choices of video games, music, and movie trailers. Participants were placed into one of eight affect conditions using a text introduction + video induction. Four conditions produced states representing emotional responses: elation, contentment, anger, sadness. These conditions featured vignettes and videos describing a situation in which the intended affect was attributed to a specific cause. The remaining conditions produced states representing moods: high-arousal positive, low-arousal positive, high-arousal negative, low-arousal negative. The mood conditions offered no attribution for intended affect. Results indicated few discernible patterns of media choices based on whether a person is experiencing a positive or negative emotion vs. mood. Differences in choices were only pronounced when the experienced affect was of low arousal and not attributable to a specific cause. These differences were seen for music and movie trailers, but not for video games.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

mood (106), condit (105), arous (85), affect (79), posit (69), emot (67), particip (66), negat (65), video (58), low (51), media (47), low-arous (43), high (40), game (40), choic (38), differ (36), state (35), induct (34), high-arous (33), music (33), sad (32),
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Association:
Name: Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p744674_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Dillman Carpentier, Francesca., Rogers, Ryan. and Stevens, Elise. "Media Choice as a Function of Prior Affect: An Attempt to Separate Mood from Emotion" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Le Centre Sheraton, Montreal, Canada, Aug 06, 2014 <Not Available>. 2014-12-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p744674_index.html>

APA Citation:

Dillman Carpentier, F. , Rogers, R. and Stevens, E. , 2014-08-06 "Media Choice as a Function of Prior Affect: An Attempt to Separate Mood from Emotion" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Le Centre Sheraton, Montreal, Canada Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-12-19 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p744674_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Media choices were compared in three studies, observed choices of video games, music, and movie trailers. Participants were placed into one of eight affect conditions using a text introduction + video induction. Four conditions produced states representing emotional responses: elation, contentment, anger, sadness. These conditions featured vignettes and videos describing a situation in which the intended affect was attributed to a specific cause. The remaining conditions produced states representing moods: high-arousal positive, low-arousal positive, high-arousal negative, low-arousal negative. The mood conditions offered no attribution for intended affect. Results indicated few discernible patterns of media choices based on whether a person is experiencing a positive or negative emotion vs. mood. Differences in choices were only pronounced when the experienced affect was of low arousal and not attributable to a specific cause. These differences were seen for music and movie trailers, but not for video games.


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Meta-Emotion During Film and Music-Video Reception: A State Measure of Liking/Disliking Emotions

Not All People With Negative Feelings Watch Comedy: Predicting Media Choice as a Function of Discrete Affective States


 
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