Citation

Same but Different: Social Media Affordances for Blackmail

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

The affordances perspective provides a much needed non-deterministic way to talk about effects of technologies and scholars have done excellent work identifying particular affordances. However more work needs to be done to thoughtfully extend these affordances, to understand their complexity, how they may lead to both positive and negative outcomes, and how they vary in different contexts. We’ve seen how the much lauded affordances of social media for collective action, for example, are the same that afford coordinated harassment like #gamergate. Yet much scholarship treats affordances as enabling positive outcomes. Focusing on the affordances of social media for blackmail, the affordances of visibility, spreadability, replicability, persistence, and anonymity have essentially democratized blackmail for those living in a surveillance state with a long tradition of such harassment. Drawing on work conducted in a political environment dominated by an authoritarian rule, this paper explicates and extends the traditional conceptualization of particular affordances.
It is well established that social media affords visibility to a broader and larger audience. Yet for those already living in a surveillance state, the increased visibility that social media affords frequently places them in precarious situations. Every action taken online is more visible to a broader audience (of both human and technological monitors) and becomes potential blackmail material. Many examples of social media activities and photos transformed into blackmail will be presented. The norm of disclosure on social media sites places individual in precarious social and legal situations much worse than without social media-generated content. Certainly, one of the greatest affordances of social media is increased spreadability. Content is easily spreadable because it is replicable and persistent, as content is accessible for an indefinite time after it is posted. Moreover, the potential lack of attribution of such materials and social media affording anonymity makes it difficult to determine who is responsible for collecting and disseminating blackmail materials. Focusing on the example of blackmail I aim to bring conceptual understanding of these affordances to a more neutral position through including less desirable outcomes.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p982989_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Pearce, Katy. "Same but Different: Social Media Affordances for Blackmail" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, <Not Available>. 2018-02-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p982989_index.html>

APA Citation:

Pearce, K. E. "Same but Different: Social Media Affordances for Blackmail" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico <Not Available>. 2018-02-13 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p982989_index.html

Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: The affordances perspective provides a much needed non-deterministic way to talk about effects of technologies and scholars have done excellent work identifying particular affordances. However more work needs to be done to thoughtfully extend these affordances, to understand their complexity, how they may lead to both positive and negative outcomes, and how they vary in different contexts. We’ve seen how the much lauded affordances of social media for collective action, for example, are the same that afford coordinated harassment like #gamergate. Yet much scholarship treats affordances as enabling positive outcomes. Focusing on the affordances of social media for blackmail, the affordances of visibility, spreadability, replicability, persistence, and anonymity have essentially democratized blackmail for those living in a surveillance state with a long tradition of such harassment. Drawing on work conducted in a political environment dominated by an authoritarian rule, this paper explicates and extends the traditional conceptualization of particular affordances.
It is well established that social media affords visibility to a broader and larger audience. Yet for those already living in a surveillance state, the increased visibility that social media affords frequently places them in precarious situations. Every action taken online is more visible to a broader audience (of both human and technological monitors) and becomes potential blackmail material. Many examples of social media activities and photos transformed into blackmail will be presented. The norm of disclosure on social media sites places individual in precarious social and legal situations much worse than without social media-generated content. Certainly, one of the greatest affordances of social media is increased spreadability. Content is easily spreadable because it is replicable and persistent, as content is accessible for an indefinite time after it is posted. Moreover, the potential lack of attribution of such materials and social media affording anonymity makes it difficult to determine who is responsible for collecting and disseminating blackmail materials. Focusing on the example of blackmail I aim to bring conceptual understanding of these affordances to a more neutral position through including less desirable outcomes.


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.