Citation

Caribbean Multiracial Ethnic Identity and Social Networking Sites

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Abstract:

Persons of mixed race are often framed as the ‘other,’ forced to construct and affirm identities based on larger societal norms where monoracial is the norm. However, being multiracial in the Caribbean is the norm and in some cases, the majority. This study investigates the ethnic history of the Caribbean, with a focus on the Anglophone Caribbean, and its role in the national and personal identities of multiracial individuals. In-depth interviews with nine Caribbean respondents reveal how social media allows them to present both their Caribbean ethnicity and their multiracial selves online and demonstrate the importance of constructing and performing ethnicity. Nationality was salient in both online and offline interactions. Alternatively, those who migrated out of the Caribbean used social media in other ways to articulate their multiracial identity when mixed race was no longer the norm, thus demonstrating the importance of visibility and representation. A cohesive mixed identity is built on the history of the Caribbean, and this in turn can help mixed individuals cope with external stereotypes, social struggles, and microaggressions given the cultural dominance of monoethnic racial discourse.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

5 (2), question, (1), inquiries (1), it, (1), travel (1), receive (1), globe. (1), ost (1), mostly (1), abroa (1), “it (1), Another (1), added (1), “especially” (1), mentioned. (1), interviewee, (1), (race) (1), matters (1), [abroad],” (1), across (1), communities (1),
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Association:
Name: International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p983434_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Maragh, Raven. and Corsbie-Massay, Charisse. "Caribbean Multiracial Ethnic Identity and Social Networking Sites" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-02-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p983434_index.html>

APA Citation:

Maragh, R. S. and Corsbie-Massay, C. L. , 2015-05-21 "Caribbean Multiracial Ethnic Identity and Social Networking Sites" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-02-13 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p983434_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Persons of mixed race are often framed as the ‘other,’ forced to construct and affirm identities based on larger societal norms where monoracial is the norm. However, being multiracial in the Caribbean is the norm and in some cases, the majority. This study investigates the ethnic history of the Caribbean, with a focus on the Anglophone Caribbean, and its role in the national and personal identities of multiracial individuals. In-depth interviews with nine Caribbean respondents reveal how social media allows them to present both their Caribbean ethnicity and their multiracial selves online and demonstrate the importance of constructing and performing ethnicity. Nationality was salient in both online and offline interactions. Alternatively, those who migrated out of the Caribbean used social media in other ways to articulate their multiracial identity when mixed race was no longer the norm, thus demonstrating the importance of visibility and representation. A cohesive mixed identity is built on the history of the Caribbean, and this in turn can help mixed individuals cope with external stereotypes, social struggles, and microaggressions given the cultural dominance of monoethnic racial discourse.


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