Citation

Empirical Support for the Media Participation Hypothesis: Longitudinal Trends Across Presidential Elections

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This study investigates the media participation hypothesis advanced by Author (2005) by examining the use of different media platforms and formats across the five most recent U.S. presidential elections (1992-2012) using American National Elections Study data. Multivariate analyses demonstrate that as participatory media become more prevalent and utilized in an electoral system, corresponding and statistically significant increases in political efficacy and perceptions of government responsiveness can be observed among the heaviest users of participatory media. Enhanced engagement with interactive media in combination with traditional media equates to more positive assessments of democratic processes and real-world offline campaign participation. At the same time, increased engagement with participatory media also shows an inverse, negative relationship with trust in government, suggesting that the close-up and sometimes overheated view that interactive media offer of politics can have corrosive effects on political attitudes. Findings for the study uphold the tenets of the media participation hypothesis while pointing to important political limitations of media participation effects.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

media (255), polit (143), use (132), particip (107), participatori (86), hypothesi (59), elect (56), campaign (55), interact (51), trust (49), sd (49), efficaci (42), increas (40), 1 (37), time (37), year (36), govern (34), effect (31), 2 (31), variabl (30), citizen (30),
Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p985849_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Bucy, Erik. and Groshek, Jacob. "Empirical Support for the Media Participation Hypothesis: Longitudinal Trends Across Presidential Elections" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 <Not Available>. 2018-02-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p985849_index.html>

APA Citation:

Bucy, E. P. and Groshek, J. , 2015-05-21 "Empirical Support for the Media Participation Hypothesis: Longitudinal Trends Across Presidential Elections" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-02-14 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p985849_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigates the media participation hypothesis advanced by Author (2005) by examining the use of different media platforms and formats across the five most recent U.S. presidential elections (1992-2012) using American National Elections Study data. Multivariate analyses demonstrate that as participatory media become more prevalent and utilized in an electoral system, corresponding and statistically significant increases in political efficacy and perceptions of government responsiveness can be observed among the heaviest users of participatory media. Enhanced engagement with interactive media in combination with traditional media equates to more positive assessments of democratic processes and real-world offline campaign participation. At the same time, increased engagement with participatory media also shows an inverse, negative relationship with trust in government, suggesting that the close-up and sometimes overheated view that interactive media offer of politics can have corrosive effects on political attitudes. Findings for the study uphold the tenets of the media participation hypothesis while pointing to important political limitations of media participation effects.


Similar Titles:
Talking as communicators: Effects of group communication, government-citizen interaction, and perceived media importance on online political discussion

Political Engagement via Mobile Communication: Unraveling the Effects of Political Trust and Efficacy on Political Participation in South Korea


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.