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2011 - 96th Annual Convention Words: 188 words || 
Info
1. Lewis, Kay. ""Making Hell for a Country": Ideas about Race War and Extermination During the Civil War and Post Civil War Era" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 96th Annual Convention, TBA, Richmond, VA, <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521896_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: The Civil War, even in the beginning, was at its heart about blacks in America and the institution of slavery, making the issue of a war between the races more relevant than ever before. Unfortunately, the Lincoln administration’s unwillingness to confront honestly the issue at hand, as well as the consistency of federal efforts for reunification with the southern states allowed for greater violence and uncontested assertions that with emancipation would come the extermination of African American people. Renewing a centuries old strategy, Confederate soldiers brutally killed many black soldiers under the policy of no quarter for negro soldiers, and they also killed women and children with equal fervor. This sort of violence did not end after the Civil War. The continued exhibitions of racially motivated and inchoate acts of brutality made many black Americans fearful that southerners did indeed intend to carry out what they had threatened to do for centuries. They had only to look around the nation and to the west, indeed to their own communities to determine that the threats were real, threats that greatly concerned the black community well into the next century.

2013 - 37th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 187 words || 
Info
2. Wright Lewis, Kay. "“Making Hell for a Country”: Ideas about Race War and Extermination During the Civil War and Post Civil War Era" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 37th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin Hotel - Downtown, Indianapolis, ID, Mar 13, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-04-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p647249_index.html>
Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Civil War, even in the beginning, was at its’ heart about blacks in America and the institution of slavery, making the issue of a war between the races more relevant than ever before. Unfortunately, the Lincoln administration’s unwillingness to confront honestly the issue at hand, as well as the consistency of federal efforts for reunification with the southern states allowed for greater violence and uncontested assertions that with emancipation would come the extermination of African American people. Renewing an old strategy, Confederate soldiers brutally killed many black soldiers under the policy of no quarter for negro soldiers, and they also killed women and children with equal fervor. This sort of violence did not end after the Civil War. The continued exhibitions of racially motivated and inchoate acts of brutality made many black Americans fearful that southerners did indeed intend to carry out what they had threatened to do for centuries. They had only to look around the nation and to the west, indeed to their own communities to determine that the threats were real, threats that greatly concerned the black community well into the next century.


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