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2013 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 7842 words || 
Info
1. Hudson, Justin. "“Reagan or Carter? Wrong Questions for Blacks”: Race and 1980s Presidential Politics in the Black Press" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p670802_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract: This project analyzes the coverage of racial politics during the 1980s presidential campaigns in two prominent African American newspapers, the Los Angeles Sentinel and the Philadelphia Tribune. Both the Sentinel and Tribune became frustrated by the lack of attention given to black issues by both the Democratic and Republican Parties, and pushed for alternative solutions, such as backing civil rights activist Jesse Jackson’s bid for presidency, as a means to politically empower the black community.

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
Info
2. Marquez, Frances. "Latino/Latina Political Appointees and the Policymaking Process: An Examination of the Characteristics, Career Paths and Impact on Executive Decision-making of the Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton Presidential Appointees" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p153104_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 29 words || 
Info
3. Spitzer, Scott. "Reagan, Race and Welfare: The Racial Structure of Welfare Politics in the 1980s" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p86455_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the racial politics of the Reagan administration?s retrenchment of welfare, linking their efforts to the politics of race and welfare in the 1960s and early 70s.

2014 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 239 words || 
Info
4. Gilbert, Robert. "The Politics of Presidential Illness: Ronald Reagan and The Iran-Contra Scandal" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Ergife Palace Hotel, Rome, Italy, Jul 04, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p720704_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In 1985, Ronald Reagan underwent major abdominal surgery for colon cancer. Doctors discovered that the cancer had spread from his colon and they removed an extensive portion of his intestines in an effort to save the President's life. Prior to surgery, Reagan invoked the 25th Amendment and Vice President Bush became Acting President for some seven hours. More importantly, the Iran-Contra scandal seemed to coincide perfectly with Reagan's cancer surgery, with the President forgetting key meetings at which he apparently had given his consent to the arms for hostages arrangement.

This surgery, along with the anesthesia and the medications he had received during his hospitalization, seem to have played key roles in his surprising memory lapses that stunned the country - as well as the investigating committees that were appointed to study his role in the scandal's unfolding. Although many believed that Reagan lied when he claimed that he did not remember giving his consent to the arms for hostages arrangement in Iran, it is the thesis of this paper that Reagan's state of mind at the time of his cancer surgery, along with the anesthesia and medications he had received while in the hospital,made it likely that he simply forgot that meeting and what had transpired on the date and time it took place. This point will be supported by citing relevant medical and psychological literature and interviews with key White House medical personnel,including White House Physician Daniel Ruge.

2004 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 460 words || 
Info
5. Marquez, Frances. "Latino/Latina Political Appointees and the Policymaking Process: An Examination of the Characteristics, Career Paths and Impact on Executive Decision making of the Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton Administration Appointees" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p83234_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Latino/Latina Political
Appointees and the Policymaking Process: An Examination of the
Characteristics, Career Paths and Impact on Executive Decision making
of the Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton
Administration Appointees This paper examines the impact of
Latino/Latina federal appointees in the Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon,
Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton Administrations. I will analyze the
paths they have taken to become appointees and their influence on
policymaking. Using in-depth interviews and statistical analysis, I
will analyze the key characteristics (age, demographics, education and
work experience) of Latino appointees. To augment the statistical
analysis, 50 Latino appointees from the Cabinet level (Presidential
Appointee with Senate Confirmation-PAS) to the Schedule C levels will
be interviewed to assess policy proposals and success. I will test
three hypotheses: • My first hypothesis is Latino appointees will have
come from a less elite socio-demographic background than the
traditional Anglo appointee. •My second hypothesis is that as the
numbers of Latino appointees increased, their proposals were more
likely to be adopted. •My third hypothesis is that Latino appointees
had proposals adopted that reflect the needs of their community and
other low-income groups. Background Representative bureaucracy scholars
would assert that a diverse bureaucracy provides better representation
and it is important that political appointees “mirror the total
society.” They argue that a more representative bureaucracy will result
in policy outputs that reflect more closely the changing interests of
our nation’s citizens (Kranz 1973; Krislov 1974; Krislov and Rosenbloom
1981). This is a critical issue given that Latinos are the fastest
growing ethnic group in the nation. In 1950 there were 2.3 million
Latinos in the United States and by the year 2000 there were 35.6
million. The increase in the Latino population has led our nation’s
chief executives to address the needs of this constituency of potential
voters and focus on appointing Latinos to positions in the Executive
Branch. The Carter Administration (1976-1980) included only 49 Latino
appointees. President Reagan (1980-1988) had 37 appointments, President
Bush (1988-1992) had 153 Latino appointees, and President Clinton
(1992-2000) had 336 appointees. Even at the end of this period of
increasing Latino appointments, the numbers within the Executive Branch
are far less than would be expected given the size of the Latino
population. Scholars have focused on how the increase in the Latino
population has led to greater representation for Latinos in elected
office at the local, state and federal levels of government (Moore and
Pachon 1985; Guerra 1990; Pachon and De Sipio 1992). While useful, this
focus on elected officials tells only part of the story. Because a
great deal of policymaking is done by appointed officials, scholarly
research on the impact of Latino appointees in the Executive Branch is
needed. Although there was one study on Latino appointees during the
Carter Administration, there has been no subsequent research. This
study will fill that gap by examining Latino appointee characteristics,
career paths, and impact on the policymaking process. I will also
measure whether the appointees believe it is important to create
policies, which specifically address the needs of Latinos.

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