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2010 - 95th Annual Convention Words: 266 words || 
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1. Rogers, Ibram. "A Social Movement of Social Movements: Conceptualizing a New Historical Framework for the Black Power Movement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436208_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Black Power Studies historians and their predecessors have regularly explored the local, tactical, and ideology diversity in the black power movement, and some have even independently described these diversity elements as movements. This paper takes the diversity consensus a step further and fuses the independent ideas of historians to present a new historiographical framework for the black power movement of the 1960s and 1970s. I argue it was a social movement of social movements. This collection of movements can be examined and understood from a spatial frame or strategic frame. Spatially, it was an international collection of local black power movements containing activists with varying objectives. In other words, there was a semi-distinct Philadelphia black power movement, Chicago black power movement, Atlanta black power movement, and unique black power movements in most Black communities. Strategically, the movement was an assortment of twenty transnational social movements waged by distinct activist groupings who applied the same general strategies in each locale. Black laborers, Black students, Black feminists, Black artists, Black prisoners, Black cadets, Black professionals, and many more groups all forged movements that together comprise the Black Power Movement, this paper reveals. The spatial frame and local diversity is a generally an accepted historiographical premise in the literature. However, the strategic frame that purports multiple strategic movements is not nearly as recognized. Therefore, a portion of the paper provides an overview of each of the twenty strategic social movements. It concludes discussing the constructive and destructive relationships between these movements, and their legacy in the 21st century.

2011 - 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 269 words || 
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2. Rogers, Ibram. "A Social Movement of Social Movements: Conceptualizing a New Historical Framework for the Black Power Movement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin, Cincinnati, OH, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p485637_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Black Power Studies historians and their predecessors have regularly explored the local, tactical, and ideology diversity in the black power movement, and some have even independently described these diversity elements as movements. This paper takes the diversity consensus a step further and fuses the independent ideas of historians to present a new historiographical framework for the black power movement of the 1960s and 1970s. I argue it was a social movement of social movements. This collection of movements can be examined and understood from a spatial frame or strategic frame. Spatially, it was an international collection of local black power movements containing activists with varying black power strategies. In other words, there was a semi-distinct Philadelphia black power movement, Chicago black power movement, Atlanta black power movement, and unique black power movements in most Black communities. Strategically, the movement was an assortment of twenty transnational social movements waged by distinct activist groupings who applied similar broad black power strategies in each locale. Black laborers, Black students, Black feminists, Black artists, Black prisoners, Black cadets, Black professionals, and many more groups all forged movements that together comprise the Black Power Movement, this paper reveals. The spatial frame and local diversity is a generally an accepted historiographical premise in the literature. However, the strategic frame that purports multiple strategic movements is not nearly as recognized. Therefore, a portion of the paper provides an overview of each of the twenty strategic social movements. It concludes discussing the constructive and destructive relationships between these movements, and their legacy in the 21st century.


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