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2011 - American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law Words: 102 words || 
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1. Bohn, Linzy., Jung, Sandy. and Allison, Meredith. "Alibi evidence: When do mock jurors find alibis hard to believe?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL, Mar 02, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482173_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The impact of the alibi salaciousness, the presence of physical evidence, and the type of crime on jurors’ ratings of believability and guilt were examined. Undergraduates (N = 317) read a fabricated police narrative. The results revealed that alibis substantiated by physical evidence led to fewer guilty verdicts, higher alibi believability, and more positive character ratings. Although salaciousness did not affect trial outcomes and believability, salacious alibis did lead to fewer positive character ratings when physical evidence was present. Defendants who committed sexual offences (vs. physical assault or theft) were more likely to receive guilty verdicts and longer sentences.


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