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2003 - International Communication Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 10587 words || 
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1. Meijer, Irene. "Beyond Ratings or Quality. Surpassing the Dilemma of Entertainment in Public Broadcasting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112145_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Entertainment is a sensitive issue for European public broadcasting organizations. After all, why does public television concern itself with entertainment to begin with? Should it not be left to the commercial networks? Contrary to common opinion, the author argues that public broadcasters can better fulfill their mission – making quality programs, supplying good information and involving people in a democratic culture – if entertainment is a significant and visible part of public programming.
This article specifically addresses the factors that complicate the full and ready acceptance of entertainment in public television: the rise of commercial television, the meaning of quality, the position of the viewer, the interpretation of ‘public service’ and the virtual absence of a quality discourse for TV-entertainment. Through a careful repertoire analysis of in-depth interviews with over fifty broadcasting professionals, the article also maps the various available options for turning entertainment into an inspiring and indispensable element of public programming.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 205 words || 
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2. Banfield, Gerald. and Boggess, Lyndsay. "Beyond the Classroom: Accounting for Community Characteristics on Rates of Serious Student Offending" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516579_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Crime in schools has drawn media attention over the last twenty years from the shootings in Columbine to the tragedies at Virginia Tech. Researchers are often quick to blame school factors such as high student to teacher ratios, lax administrative policies, and insufficient funding for school violence. Meanwhile, policymakers rush to conquer school crime with metal detectors, zero-tolerance policies, and gang prevention programs. However, the greater community context of school crime is typically overlooked despite literature that suggests crime and social disorganization in neighborhoods have a relationship with crime in nearby schools. Therefore, this study will examine whether the relationship between school characteristics and rates of serious school offending are moderated by community context. We use data from all public middle and senior high schools in Los Angeles and aggregate block group demographic and crime data into buffers around the school campus to create school-specific communities. Preliminary results suggest that the community characteristics and local rates of crime can affect rates of serious student offending on campus, but that the relationship may differ between middle and high schools. This study hopes to add generalizability to schools and community crime literature and offer policy implications that incorporate the local community.

2011 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 9435 words || 
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3. Olson, Jeremiah. and Fording, Richard. "Beyond the Imprisonment Rate: The Effect of Race and Ethnicity on State Prison Conditions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 05, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p455961_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A number of studies have examined the determinants of state imprisonment rates, finding that the social and political context plays an important role in explaining variation in state preferences for punishment. However, very little attention has been paid to the manner in which inmates are treated once they are imprisoned, despite the fact that significant variation exists in state prison conditions and services offered to prisoners. This paper extends the literature on state imprisonment policy by examining the effects of race and the state political context on various dimensions of state prison conditions. The sample includes approximately 1,200 state prisons included in the 2000 Bureau of Justice Statistics Census of Federal and State Correctional Facilities. Using multi-level modeling, we examine the effects of the racial composition of the prison, along with additional characteristics of the prison and state environment, on the provision of mental health services, overcrowding, and the use of disciplinary sanctions. Preliminary findings suggest that the racial composition of the prison population is the most significant and consistent predictor of inmate treatment. More specifically, prisons with relatively larger black and Latino inmate populations are less likely to offer important mental health treatment services, are more likely to engage in overcrowding, and are more likely to use harsh disciplinary sanctions.

2012 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 12650 words || 
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4. Myers, Brandon. "Beyond Ideology: Examining Polarization using Political Outgroup Rating" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 12, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p544446_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite much attention to the issue in recent years, the nature and extent of partisan political polarization in the American electorate remains an unsettled question. In response to this impasse, I argue that the meaningful effects of polarization result not only from the distribution of opinions amongst citizens, but also how individual citizens perceive those with whom they disagree, termed political outgroup rating. The question diffusely asks, for instance, “What does a Democrat think about Republicans?” Supposing that there are differences between the way people of similar political stripes evaluate outgroups, here I hypothesize a social psychological cause, arguing that people who display ideological rigidity will more view their political opponents more negatively than those who do not. Using the 2008 ANES, I find evidence for the theory. The implications of this finding for future research into polarization and the nature of partisanship are discussed.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 44 pages || Words: 11571 words || 
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5. Kinderman, Daniel. "The Political Economy of Sectoral Exchange Rate Preferences and Lobbying: Germany from 1960-2007, and Beyond" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p254579_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Do the observable preferences and behavior of economic actors correspond to microeconomic models? I address this general question by examining the microfoundations of firms´exchange-rate preferences and lobbying activity between 1960 and 2005 in Germany, one of the most internationally exposed and export-oriented economies. The phenomena to be explained are twofold. First, lobbying activity appears to have declined over time. Archival sources provide evidence of strong preference articulation and exchange-rate lobbying during the 1960s and 1970s. In recent years, by contrast, the intensity of firms’ lobbying activity has gone down, despite greater exchange-rate fluctuations and currency appreciations, which are costly for export-oriented producers. Second, there is substantial variation in the propensity of different corporations to lobby over exchange-rate levels. I argue that the extent of internationalization of firms is key for explaining both of these observations and the political economy of exchange-rate preferences and lobbying more generally. Firms and sectors with a low degree of ‘operational hedging’ or diversification across different currency areas are much more likely to have preferences for a low exchange rate and to lobby over exchange-rate levels than their diversified counterparts. Framed as a debate between Jeffry Frieden and Kathleen McNamara: despite the power of Frieden’s microeconomic model for the period analyzed in this paper, we may be moving towards a world without pronounced or highly differentiated exchange-rate preferences – towards a situation in which ‘no preference is the stable equilibrium.’ The possibility that the predictive power of microeconomic models over actors’ preferences in an area as close to the core of economic rationality as exchange rates could decline at the same time as markets and commodity relations become universal should strike us as at least somewhat ironic.

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