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2010 - 95th Annual Convention Words: 260 words || 
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1. Chapman, Erin D.. "Consuming Herself: New Negro Women and Sexual Self-Determination in the Marketplace" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435114_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: It was through the purchase of clothes, cosmetics, race records, and other luxuries and entertainments, as much as through travel, work and politics, that African American migrants transformed themselves from rural rubes or small-town ingénues to urban, sophisticated, undaunted New Negroes. As much as any other factor, the clothes and the cosmetics, the music and the nightlife helped early twentieth-century black people forge new identities, develop new attitudes, and shape their destinies in this period. Although, as the New Negro progressives constantly lamented, newly urban African Americans were most often employed in the dirtiest, most dangerous, and lowest paying industrial and domestic jobs at the bottom of the employment scale, they nevertheless made more money than ever before. The migrants had a new disposable income to spend, and, despite their hardships and the disapproval of people like E. Franklin Frazier and Elise Johnson McDougald, they spent a great deal of it enjoying their new lives in the city and re-creating themselves as New Negroes.

This paper will discuss the politics of gender and self-determination that impacted the New Negro identity transformation and the consumption patterns that developed around and through that process, particularly as they affected African American women. As they sought to remake themselves and take advantage of the era’s vaunted opportunities to change their lives, black women encountered an early-twentieth-century combination of racism and sexism that operated intra-racially as well as interracially. This paper will focus on the market-oriented, discursive strategies African American women developed to confront this complex oppression.


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