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2011 - 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 269 words || 
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1. Elmeski, Mohammed. "Decentralizing school governance: A policy analysis of parent-school partnership in Morocco’s public middle schools." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Apr 30, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p485519_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Building working partnerships is increasingly sought as a sustainable and agency affirming mechanism for national development. In Morocco, more than 30% of the adult population is illiterate. According to the United Nations Human Development Program (2009), 31.1% of Moroccans are still in poverty. Building parent-school partnerships with poor and undereducated parents has been a constant challenge for Morocco at least since the launch of national educational reform in 1999. The purpose of this study is to help surmount this challenge by investigating why parent-school partnerships have not succeeded at the middle school level.
Grounded in Kingdon’s multiple streams model (Kingdon, 1995), this study tests the hypothesis that policies which do not seek political consensus among local interest groups are less likely to succeed during implementation. In this regard, this study investigates (1) the extent to which consensus exists among parents and teachers with regard to defining educational problems and proposing corresponding solutions. (2) the extent to which consensus around problems and solutions impact how parents and teachers see each other as partners. And (3) other factors that influence parent-school partnership in Morocco’s middle schools.
A survey was administered to investigate the existence of consensus between parents and teachers and the extent to which such consensus could explain parent-school partnerships. Preliminary survey findings suggest that neither parents nor teachers have a unified understanding of problems and solutions at the middle schools level. The final results of the survey will be further probed in the focus group interviews scheduled between December 15, 2010 and January 31, 2011. The findings of this study will be available by April 2011.


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