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Showing 1 through 2 of 2 records.
2003 - International Communication Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 8594 words || 
Info
1. Ross, Karen. "Democratic participation and public access broadcasting: Caller Perspectives on Election Call" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112334_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There has been much recent discussion about the changing nature of ‘the public sphere’ with the relatively new genre of RealityTV being viewed as a space in which the public can at least perform, if not always engage in meaningful debate. This paper considers the perspectives of callers to a political talk show – Election Call – in terms of why they call in, what they think about their interactions with politicians and how they regard the programme’s potential to constitute a public sphere. It also looks at the gendered aspects of caller experiences and beliefs in order to tease out if gender has any influence on the public’s practice of politics. The programme – Election Call – is a BBC production which has been broadcasting since 1974, going out simultaneously on radio and TV (and the web for 2001), in the days immediately preceding the British general election. I argue that whilst callers mostly felt very positive about the experience of appearing on the show and having the opportunity to put their point of view, and believed that Election Call fulfilled an important democratic function, they were much more negative in their assessment of their interactions with politicians, believing that it continues to be difficult to get a straight answer out of our elected members.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 15 pages || Words: 8282 words || 
Info
2. Ross, Karen. "Democratic Participation and Public Access Broadcasting: Caller Perspectives on Election Call" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112403_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There has been much recent discussion about the changing nature of 'the public sphere' with the relatively new genre of RealityTV being viewed as a space in which the public can at least perform, if not always engage in meaningful debate. This paper considers the perspectives of callers to a political talk show – Election Call – in terms of why they call in, what they think about their interactions with politicians and how they regard the programme's potential to constitute a public sphere. It looks at the gendered aspects of caller experiences and beliefs in order to tease out if gender has any influence on the public's practice of politics in this particular context. The programme – Election Call – is a BBC production which has been broadcasting since 1974, going out simultaneously on radio and TV (and the web for 2001), in the days immediately preceding the British general election. I argue that whilst callers (both women and men) mostly felt positive about the experience of appearing on the show and having the opportunity to put their point of view, and believed that Election Call fulfils an important democratic function, women especially were much more negative in their assessment of their interactions with politicians, believing that it continues to be difficult to get a straight answer out of those elected to serve and represent us.


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