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2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 6622 words || 
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1. Mutchler, Matt., colemon, leonardo., Neith, Katie. and Davtyan, Mariam. "Differences by Race/ethnicity and Partner Gender in Safer Sex Strategies and Stigma among HIV+ MSMW" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p21207_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Introduction: Little is known about the sexual risk behaviors of HIV+ men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) since they are often grouped with gay men. The female sexual partners of HIV+ MSMW may be particularly vulnerable to HIV infection.
Methods: This study recruited a convenience sample of 150 HIV+ MSMW (50 Caucasian, 50 Latino, and 50 African American) at HIV/AIDS service organizations. Between August 2003 and July 2004, the respondents completed 90 minute interviewer-administered cross-sectional surveys. Domains included demographics, sexual risk behaviors, HIV status and bisexuality disclosure, HIV and sexual stigma, substance use, and safer sex communication. Univariate, bivariate and logistic regression analyses of the data identified differences by race/ethnicity and predictors of unprotected sex with female and male primary sexual partners.
Results: Perceptions of stigma, disclosure behaviors, and communication patterns differ significantly depending on race/ethnicity and gender of primary partners. Sexual stigma and safer sex communication predicted unprotected sex with female primary partners. HIV status of partner predicted unprotected sex with male primary partners.
Conclusion: HIV prevention interventions for HIV+ MSMW should be tailored to race/ethnicity and partner gender, and should stress serosorting strategies, safer sex communication and sexual stigma.


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