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2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 32 pages || Words: 8895 words || 
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1. Healy, Teresa. "Great Recession or the Great Aggression?: Canadian Labour Weighs the Costs of Economic Integration in North America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p499296_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since October 2008, when the economic crisis hit with full force, Statistics Canada has been reporting alarming rates of unemployment. Indeed, the loss of good jobs has been significant since the Canadian manufacturing crisis began in 2002, but as the “Great Recession” gathered force, workers witnessed the unfolding of an utter catastrophe across the country. Now, the recession has been declared over, but unemployment remains high in Canada and workers and their unions continue to be disciplined by factory and mill closures, internal migration, international free trade and investment agreements, ongoing corporate tax cuts, an inadequate social safety net, increased income inequality, the re-emergence of debt and deficits, and state alliances with international capital bent on wresting deep concessions from labour. Despite all evidence to the contrary, labour is now being scapegoated in the wake of a crisis that it did not create, and neo-liberal solutions are being sought as a solution to a massive crisis caused by neo-liberal capitalism itself. These disciplines did not emerge as a result of the ‘Great Recession’ but ahead of it with the result that the ‘Great Repression’ continues.

2014 - SASE Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 11749 words || 
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2. Bernard Jr., Prosper. "Canadian Political Economy and the Great Recession of 2008-2009: The Politics of Coping with Economic Crisis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA, Jul 10, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p729253_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The emerging comparative political economy literature on the Great Recession of 2008–09 has offered useful leverage to analyze the causes of and responses to the Great Recession of 2008–09. In particular, important analytical insights have emerged in three areas of inquiry. First, cross-national differences in the severity and duration of the crisis illustrate the utility of studying the Great Recession as an endogenous crisis—that is, a consequence of past national policy choices. Second, cross-temporal studies of economic recessions reveal that the dominance of market liberalism led governments to cope with the Great Recession using policy instruments that were different from those employed in reaction to previous recessions. Third, government partisanship and electoral politics, as country studies illustrate, affected not only economic policies in the run up to the recession, but also influenced the profile of counter-cyclical programs and of post-stimulus austerity measures. So far, these research endeavors have devoted much more attention to the crisis experiences of great economic powers and Eurozone countries. The purpose of this study is to incorporate the study of Canada in the above inquiry areas.

The paper makes three arguments. First, the downside of the recent Canadian business cycle—specifically, its macroeconomic and financial characteristics—were shaped to a large extent by prior economic policies. Since the mid-1980s, Canada has followed a growth policy strategy that has hitched the country’s economy to the American economy. Consequently, the American recession precipitated a slump in Canadian exports by a magnitude unseen in previous recession cycles, triggering an immediate nosedive in business investments and rise in the unemployment rate. Furthermore, the absence of a systemic banking crisis but presence of pockets of financial instability in the latest business cycle was attributed to policy practices in Canada’s financial system. The partial deregulation of the home mortgage market and occurrence of regulatory oversight lapses of the fast growing asset-backed commercial paper (ABCP) market in the run-up to the recession introduced vulnerabilities in the country’s financial system. These unsettling dynamics, however, failed to destabilize the system as a result of the palliative effects of the preexisting banking regulatory regime.

Second, the crisis response of the governments of Canada and of other rich OECD countries corroborates a key aspect of the ascent of the market liberal paradigm that began some thirty years ago. The recent counter-cyclical policies were designed with the objective of curtailing the growth of the public sector while employing incentive-based instruments to achieve market-led recoveries. At the same time public expenditures increased because of automatic stabilizers and stimulus spending, public officials in Ottawa and other capitals were aiming to contain their costs. With fiscal austerity on their minds, governments announced one-time, short-term stimulus packages and hemmed in social welfare expansion. Further, preference was given to pro-growth instruments such as tax expenditures, tax cuts, and public infrastructure investments in order to catalyze a private sector led recovery.

Finally, I argue that the direction and substance of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s economic policies during the period from 2006 to 2012 were shaped by both partisan and electoral politics. In contrast to previous cycles of economic crisis in which partisanship worked in a predictable fashion in Canada, the influence of partisan politics on economic policies pursued before, during, and immediately after the Great Recession varied. The policy effects of partisanship are evident leading up to and in the wake of the Great Recession, but milder during the crisis. I attribute the latter to the influence of electoral politics which tends to blur partisan distinctions.

2011 - Oklahoma Research Day Words: 184 words || 
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3. Jardel, Jacob. "Economies in Recess: Comparison Between America's Great Depression and Great Recession" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oklahoma Research Day, Cameron University, Lawton, OK, Nov 04, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p548225_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: With America’s current economic recession, many of its citizens hearken back in history to the Great Depression of 1930s, the worst economic downturn in U.S. history where real GDP declined 30 percent and unemployment rate reached 25 percent. The Depression was prolonged and the economy did not recover until the Second World War in 1942. The modern recession in 2007-2009 is the worst recession in the post-World War period. Real GDP declined by 6 percent and unemployment rate reached its highest level in 30 years. Because of its severity and similarity with Great Depression, some call it The Great Recession. Both the Depression and the Recession are similar in many respects. They both were very severe and prolonged. Unlike the other recessions, they both experienced financial crisis as well as bank failures. The purpose of this paper is to present historical overview of the Great Depression, lessons learned from it, and how it compares with the recent recession of 2007-2009. We will also examine different policies that were used to speed the economic recovery.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 203 words || 
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4. Gottschalk, Marie. "The Great Recession and the Great Confinement: The Economic Crisis and the Future of Penal Reform" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p432046_index.html>
Publication Type: Presidential Panel Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Great Recession coupled with the election of Barack Obama has raised expectations that the United States will begin emptying its jails and prisons because it can no longer afford to keep so many people locked up. Although the current economic crisis provides an opening to rethink the direction of U.S. penal policies, if history is any guide, rising public anxiety in the face of persistent economic distress and growing economic inequalities might actually ignite more hard-line penal policies, for several reasons: economic crises create enormous societal anxieties and insecurities that could fortify the “culture of control“ that David Garland identified as the lifeblood of the prison boom that took off three decades ago; in times of political and social unrest, public officials and prominent commentators often conflate crime and social protest, providing an opening to build up the law-and-order apparatus; as evidenced by the New Deal, economic crises provide an opportunity to legitimize the expansion of all sorts of federal and state powers, from control of the economy to law enforcement; certain economic development arguments in favor of prisons have more sway in economic hard times; and the vested interests in maintaining an expansive penal system in the United States remain considerable.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9403 words || 
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5. Renzulli, Linda. and Barr, Ashley. "Great Expectations After the Great Recession? Family Economic Shocks and Changing Educational Expectations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1007694_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this work, we examine how family economic shocks affect college expectations. We consider two important dimensions of college expectations. First we consider students’ and parents’ expectations to earn a BA and then we consider the route by which they plan to meet these expectations – directly to a 4-year college or through a 2-year institution first. We use the High School Longitudinal Study to analyze change in these expectations from 9th grade to 11th grade and consider the possible selection effects by examining propensity score models. We find that in the face of family financial crises, once-expectant high schoolers and their parents lowered their expectations to obtain a BA degree and altered their planned route for postsecondary education. Consistent with our hypotheses, the effect of family economic shocks on both degree and institution expectations differed by SES. Perhaps surprisingly, the expectations of middle-class students and parents proved more responsive to family economic shocks than did those of their lower SES counterparts. Our work has implications for pathways to educational attainment and the role of 2-year institutions.

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