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2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 246 words || 
Info
1. Hoke, Brenda. "01. Engaging Students in the Twenty-First Century Classroom:The Importance of Using Community Research Projects as a Strategy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p508219_index.html>
Publication Type: Informal Discussion Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Community service-learning courses provide students with a deeper understanding of the interdependence of people, social institutions and communities. As many students enter our classrooms armed with tremendous technological skills and the desire to help create a better world, the members of this panel are searching for strategies that can be used to channel student energy into community research projects that connect theory, methods and the life outside our campus walls.
We will discuss courses that lead students to develop a sense of relatedness to community members not as objects but as humans with intersecting life stories not dissimilar from their own. A central theme to be examined is how to channel the disconnected aspects of student engagement with technology into community projects that lead to uncovering relationships with others as valued human beings constructing viable communities. It is expected that participants in this discussion will arrive at creative and innovative methods for constructing theory-practice courses that acknowledge and honor the value of relationships in community.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 230 words || 
Info
2. Curtis, John., Amaya, Nicole. and Kisielewski, Michael. "01. Research Support for Sociologists, American Sociological Association" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1038432_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: The American Sociological Association (ASA) provides funding to sociologists through several small awards and fellowship programs. These include the Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline small grants program, Teaching Enhancement grants, and the Spivack program for applied and policy research.
The ASA and the National Science Foundation jointly support the Fund for the Advancement for the Discipline (FAD). The goal of FAD is to nurture the development of sociological knowledge by funding innovative research. FAD provides support (up to $8,000) toward research projects or conferences that can advance knowledge and lead to the acquisition of additional funds. Awards are limited to individuals with PhD degrees or the equivalent.

ASA provides awards (up to $2,000) through its Howery Teaching Enhancement Grants Program to support projects that extend the quality of sociology teaching in the United States and Canada. Individuals, departments, and a program or committee of a state or regional association are eligible to apply.

Through its Sydney S. Spivack Program in Applied Social Research and Social Policy, ASA supports a Congressional Fellowship and Community Action Research Initiative grants. The ASA Congressional Fellowship provides PhD level sociologists with in-depth experience as a staff member of a Congressional Committee or in a Congressional Office or agency. The Community Action Research Initiative grants provide support, ranging from $1,000 to $3,000 for sociological work with community organizations, local public interest groups, or community action projects.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 230 words || 
Info
3. Curtis, John., Amaya, Nicole. and Kisielewski, Michael. "01. Research Support for Sociologists, American Sociological Association" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1155204_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: The American Sociological Association (ASA) provides funding to sociologists through several small awards and fellowship programs. These include the Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline small grants program, Teaching Enhancement grants, and the Spivack program for applied and policy research.

The ASA and the National Science Foundation jointly support the Fund for the Advancement for the Discipline (FAD). The goal of FAD is to nurture the development of sociological knowledge by funding innovative research. FAD provides support (up to $8,000) toward research projects or conferences that can advance knowledge and lead to the acquisition of additional funds. Awards are limited to individuals with PhD degrees or the equivalent.

ASA provides awards (up to $2,000) through its Howery Teaching Enhancement Grants Program to support projects that extend the quality of sociology teaching in the United States and Canada. Individuals, departments, and a program or committee of a state or regional association are eligible to apply.

Through its Sydney S. Spivack Program in Applied Social Research and Social Policy, ASA supports a Congressional Fellowship and Community Action Research Initiative grants. The ASA Congressional Fellowship provides PhD level sociologists with in-depth experience as a staff member of a Congressional Committee or in a Congressional Office or agency. The Community Action Research Initiative grants provide support, ranging from $1,000 to $3,000 for sociological work with community organizations, local public interest groups, or community action projects.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 6443 words || 
Info
4. Beck, Audrey. "Poster 01. Attraction to Socially Distant Marriage: A Test of Demographic Sex Ratio and Structural Theories" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p103551_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Very little research has explored how attraction to socially distant marriage varies across marriage market contexts, despite thorough theorizing on the topic. This paper examines whether socially distant marriages are more attractive under conditions of male scarcity in the marriage market than under conditions of male abundance, as measured by both the sex ratio and Wilson’s (1987) Male Marriageable Pool Index. These results are contrasted with analyses that illustrate how mate concentration, as suggested by structural theory, affects attraction to socially distant marriage. Attraction to marriage is isolated using Schoen’s (1981) harmonic mean and multivariate linear regression models. Evidence suggests support for both demographic sex ratio theory and structural theory. However, more complex patterns emerge when considering overlapping contexts and varying measures of partner characteristics.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 515 words || 
Info
5. Embser-Herbert, M Sheridan. "01. A Meaningful Life: Scholarship, Teaching, and Activism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1005533_index.html>
Publication Type: Informal Discussion Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Though often deemphasized in its effort to be taken seriously, sociology has its roots in activism and the world of the public intellectual. Michael Burawoy reminded us of this when, describing the early years of the discipline he wrote, “But then the storm of progress got caught in sociology’s wings. If our predecessors set out to change the world we have too often ended up conserving it. Fighting for a place in the academic sun, sociology developed its own specialized knowledge…” (ASA 2004 Presidential Address)

For several decades, whether marching in the streets or arguing for policy makers to take their work seriously, sociologists across a range of interests have sought a return to these roots. Yet, we are often faced with a series of if/then propositions. “If I want tenure, then I must publish…” “If I include this in class, then my chair…”

How can sociologists be taken seriously as scholars, nurture the discipline, yet remain true to what is, for many, a calling to change the world – or at least to try to do so? This session is aimed at creating a space for scholars, the new and not-so-new, to share experiences and ideas about how to successfully balance our “scholarly needs and desires” with our passions. In some instances, though not all, our scholarship, teaching, and our passion for social change center on the same issues. In either case, life often requires a delicate balancing act.

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