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2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
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1. Elgun, Ozlem. "How to Lose a War in 10 Days: Personalization of Military Regimes and War Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p151533_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2004 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 8981 words || 
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2. Robbins, Suzanne. "Cooperation as an Interest Group Strategy: Implementation of Sections 9 & 10 of the Endangered Species Act (1982, as Amended)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p83156_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Group influence is an important element of study within political science. How much influence do organized interests exert within the policy process? Is this influence a normatively “good” thing, i.e., linking citizens to government? Or is it a “bad” thing? This study steps back and examines the question from the perspective of how groups might use their resources to influence public policy. I do so not at the legislative or agenda-setting phase of public policy, but at the implementation of policy, where agency officials have discretion to design rules and negotiate agreements without the scrutiny of elected officials. I argue that groups are active in securing the benefits or ameliorating the effects of legislation and devise cooperative or conflictual strategies to affect this process.

Measuring cooperation along a continuum, I argue the degree of cooperation groups exhibit is affected by the policy context, in addition to group resources. The policy context shapes the relative degree of information and access available to groups. Groups lacking access and specialized information regarding the process will fight the process more visibly than those groups with these resources.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 225 words || 
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3. Champion, Dean. "Tri-State 10-Year Study of Juvenile Transfers: A Serious Threat to Juvenile Offenders?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p32043_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: An analysis of a recent 10-year trend in juvenile waiver, transfer, or certification hearings in Florida, North Carolina, and Tennessee shows that waivers have stabilized and that less than 1 percent of all juveniles who move beyond the intake stage are ever charged as adults. A common belief is that waivers of juveniles to criminal court is a deterrent to further juvenile offending. However, for the jurisdictions examined here, waivers fall far short of achieving this just-deserts objective. During the 1990-1999 period, the majority of juveniles waived in the jurisdictions studied were largely property or drug offenders. Only about 39 percent of those transferred were violent offenders. Furthermore, only about 7 percent of those transferred subsequently served time in correctional facilities. Approximately 48 percent of those transferred either had their cases dismissed or the charges were downgraded to less serious misdemeanors and diversion or probation was imposed. The result of waivers in these jurisdictions is that the most serious offenders in the juvenile justice system are not targeted for criminal court transfers. When these juveniles reach criminal courts for processing, they have over a 90 percent chance of having their cases either dismissed, downgraded, or plea bargained with probationary outcomes. Thus, waivers are not necessarily accomplishing what juvenile courts intend by these actions. Policy implications of what happens to juveniles once transferred are discussed.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 3 pages || Words: 756 words || 
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4. Takata, Susan. and Curran, Jeanne. "Table 10. Each One Teach One: Creativity, Competence and Community-Building Beyond the Classroom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p240055_index.html>
Publication Type: Informal Discussion Roundtable
Abstract: For over thirty years, our ongoing experimental teaching/learning model has evolved based on student feedback. We have been intrigued with the question of how to return the "joy of learning" back into the classroom. In other words, how students become internally motivated to learn. Without traditional term papers and blue book exams, our students are encouraged to present evidence of their learning visually and creatively. Our courses conclude with a science fair type exhibition in the classroom where "each one teach one." The purpose of this informal roundtable discussion is to share with others how we have built learning communities beyond the classroom. In addition, we would like to know what others are doing to build such communities.

2009 - 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 201 words || 
Info
5. Banik, Koli. "The Paris Declaration in the education sector: A survey of 10 FTI endorsed countries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Francis Marion Hotel, Charleston, South Carolina, Mar 22, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297174_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Fast Track Initiative (FTI) is a global partnership between donors and developing countries to accelerate progress toward the Millennium Development Goal of universal primary education by 2015. All low-income countries which demonstrate serious commitment to achieving universal primary completion can receive support from the FTI.

The FTI seeks to mobilize both domestic and external funding in ways that encourage demand-driven approaches, aligned with countries’ own planning processes, and harmonized across donors if alignment is not feasible. As such, the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness, approved in 2005, is a practical blueprint for development aid to be provided in more efficient and effective ways to better meet the needs of developing countries. The FTI Secretariat conducted an education sector survey of the Paris Indicators in 10 FTI endorsed countries: Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Ghana, Honduras, Madagascar, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nicaragua, and Rwanda.

The results indicate substantial progress on the majority of the Paris Indicators in most of the FTI surveyed countries. In several countries, the education sector performs significantly better than the overall national scores. The FTI is regarded as a possible model for other sectors in putting Paris Declaration principles into practice in one of the largest spending sectors.

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