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Showing 1 through 5 of 54 records.
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2006 - American Historical Association Words: 222 words || 
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1. Cserno, Isabell. "Selling the Nation: The Role of Racialized Advertisements in Creating National Identities in the US and Germany, 1893 to 1933" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Historical Association, <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p27657_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: This poster session focuses on two iconic visual representations of blacks, Aunt Jemima in the US and the Sarotti-Moor in Germany . Aunt Jemima is the trademark of pancake flour and other related products distributed by the Quaker Oats Company based in Chicago. The Sarotti-Moor is the trademark of a major chocolate brand in Germany, currently owned by the Stollwerck AG, located in Cologne, Germany. This poster session will illustrate some ways that visual representations of race in advertisement in the US and Germany between 1893 and 1933 reflect how national identities are negotiated and disseminated among large groups of people. This presentation will showcase how these two brandnames successfully appealed to consumer’s racial and national ideologies to market their products through the representations of black servants in their advertisements. Aunt Jemima pancakes were introduced in 1893, during the World Columbia Exposition, whereas the Sarotti-Moor was born in 1918, at the end of World War I. Both images will be contextualized with other forms of representations of blacks in material culture. Through a comparative lens, this presentation will focus on exploring the deeper cultural narratives of national imagination via images that portray nostalgic comfort (Aunt Jemima) and colonial fantasies and desires (Sarotti-Mohr). It will also investigate how these seemingly opposing narratives of nostalgic comfort and colonial exoticism are connected with each other.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 4253 words || 
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2. Breckenridge, R.. "Regulatory Dynamics and Industry Demographics: Organizational Vitality in US Comic Book Publishers, 1933-2002." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110519_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the effects of 1) density dependence, 2) regulations that limited comic book content and 2) the changing structure of product distribution on the demography of comic book publishers in the United States between 1933 and 1999. Augmenting density dependence hypotheses, we hypothesize 1) that early periods of regulation served to legitimate the industry via the creation of associations internal to the publishers, while 2) later regulatory periods enhanced competition – and filtered out certain organizations – via the creation of associations composed of both publishers and distributors. Further, we hypothesize that 3) initial developments of direct-marketing should foster founding of new firms, while 4) later consolidation of direct-marketers should promote failure.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 17 pages || Words: 4865 words || 
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3. Cruz, Adrian. "A Function of Racism: The Failure of Mexican and Filipino Strike Waves in California Agriculture, 1933-1939" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104166_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Mexican and Filipino farm workers in California formed the labor union known as the United Farm Workers of America in 1965. However, Mexican and Filipino farm workers made concerted efforts to form agricultural labor unions three decades earlier. Between 1933 and 1939, agricultural labor strikes would occur throughout California led by large numbers of Filipino and Mexican workers. This paper answers the following questions: Why were Filipino and Mexican farm workers unable to succeed in forming an agricultural labor union in the 1930s? Previous studies on California farm workers fail to provide adequate analysis of the effects of race, ethnicity, and white racism on the ability of workers of color to form a multiracial labor union. The paper argues that the failure of strikes in the 1930s are a function of white supremacy emanating from landowners, the government, organized labor, and the public at large.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 5210 words || 
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4. Burke, Victor. "Power and Society:The State, Capitalism, and Social Welfare, During the New Deal 1933-1935" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181848_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Power and Society, constructs a neo-Weberian theory of the state dealing with how the state's power and policies are exercised in modern rational-legal democratic capitalist societies. I explore this theory through an historical case study of the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA), and the subsequent National Recovery Administration (NRA) 1933-1935, during this first phase of the New Deal. Influenced by the new cultural approaches to the state, I particularly mind the clash of the various ideologies that were involved in the formation, development, and the ultimate fate of the NRA. Though ideologies and ethics may be used interchangeably, in this paper I refer to ideologies as ethics because that is the term most often used by Weber when describing behaviorally observable ideologies or ideologies that influence human behavior.

2010 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 124 words || 
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5. Borrelli, MaryAnne. "Gender, Race, and the Cabinet (1933-2010); A Transgendered Institution?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Omni Parker House, Boston, MA, Nov 11, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p437702_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Cabinet nominations have become a favored method of signaling responsiveness to historically marginalized peoples, especially by presidents courting the votes of white women and people of color. Yet cabinet nominations may be more about showcasing than about substance, providing more limited representation than the chief executive promises as a candidate or as an officeholder. This paper up-dates previous studies of cabinet representation, assessing the changes effected from the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration through the George W. Bush and (early) Barack H. Obama administrations. In so doing, it assesses the extent to which presidential nominations have integrated white women and people of color into the top levels of the executive branch, facilitating leadership; or have accepted their presence, while limiting their power.

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