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2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
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1. Bejarano, Ana. "Assessing the Consequences of Institutional Change: Colombia???s Constitution of 1991" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152666_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 33 pages || Words: 7354 words || 
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2. Sunil, Thankam. and Pillai, Vijayan. "Age at marriage, contraceptive use and abortion in Yemen 1991-1997" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108912_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper attempts to examine the extent of influence of the three components of fertility, age at marriage, extent of modern contraceptive use and the level of abortion on fertility in the Republic of Yemen and to explore the impact of a selected set of demographic and socioeconomic variables on the three fertility components. This study uses data from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted in Yemen in 1991/1992 and 1997. The results from this study present empirical evidence of an onset of fertility decline in the Republic of Yemen. An important component of this decline is delayed age at marriage. There has been an increase in modem contraceptive use during the last decade. However, these methods are not widely used at early stages of family formation. The most common method of family limitation among women with large families is abortion. There has been very little change if any in the widespread occurrence of abortion during the last decade. There exist significant urban-rural differences in the levels of contraceptive use and abortion. Improvements in women's education and modem sector labor participation are crucial for increasing age at marriage, and level of contraceptive use and for reducing the prevailing level of abortion.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 9902 words || 
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3. Shu, Xiaoling., Zhu, Yifei. and Zhang, Zhanxin. "Housework and Household Decision-Making in Urban China: 1991 and 2000" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p22946_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Using data from 1991 and 2000 national surveys, this paper analyzes the influences of gender norms and market transition on two dimensions of marital power: housework and decision-making in urban China. First, we found support for the resource theory that relative income of spouses determines the division of housework and household decision-making so long as husband’s relative income exceeds half of the family income (breadwinner husband) and wife’s remain below half (dependent wife). Such an association does not exist for relative income outside these ranges or in 1991 when the market was underdeveloped in China. These findings indicate that determination of marital power is bounded by both the dominant gender ideology and the salience of economic principles of exchange. Second, we found a positive association between housework and decision-making for both sexes in both years, which challenges the assumption that doing housework is aversive and indicative of powerlessness. We argue that the social norm of codependence within Chinese households and wives’ readiness to use their overwhelming share of housework to demand equitable marital power has given rise to such a pattern. That this positive association is larger for wives than for husbands in 2000 indicates that housework is becoming an increasingly gendered resource. While promoting the principle of economic exchange in guiding social relations, the Chinese market transition fails to undermine the impacts of traditional gender ideology. These two seemingly contradictory elements are now operating hand in hand within Chinese households.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 519 words || 
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4. Cohn, Samuel. "How Third World States Can Raise Employment Even Under Globalization: Service Employment in Brazil 1991-2000" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104088_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper considers the types of governments that less developed nations can use to raise employment even in fiscal crisis. One effective option is adult vocational education which is both cheap and supported by significant transnational governments. In principle, such programs should fail because high labor surpluses and low reservation wages facilitate employer on the job training, reducing the impact of government training in raising human capital stocks per se. The surprise twist is that graduates of adult vocational training who are self employed market their way into economic success by increasing aggregate demand for their sector. This unexpected finding is illustrated with econometric data on service sector employment in Brazil. The key lesson is that more attention needs to be paid to programs that increase self employment and less to human capital per se.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 6417 words || 
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5. Milicevic, Aleksandra. and Bailey, Stanley. "Joining the War: Masculinity, Nationalism and War Participation in the Balkans War of Secession, 1991-1995" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p105012_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This project attempts to deepen our understanding of some of the motivating factors that lead people to opt for armed struggle as a conflict resolution strategy. It does so through a unique case study of the attitudes of men from Serbia towards the wars in Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina (1991-1995), specifically through a comparative study of armed volunteers and draft-dodgers. I explore why certain people joined the war voluntarily while others decided to evade it. On a macro level of investigation, I make a distinction between the social groups for which the messages of radical political leaders were most plausible, and those for which these messages were insufficient motivation to join the war effort. On a micro level of investigation, I look into the ways in which masculinities and femininities intersect and overlap, influence and are influenced by war participation or non-participation.
First, I explore the traditional configuration of gender practices, the changes that occurred during socialism, and the transformations in gender identities and practices that occurred prior to and during the wars that took place after the break up of Yugoslavia. Second, I explore dominant models of masculinity and femininity and cultural values attached to them, as well as the alternative ways of imagining and enacting masculinity and femininity. Third, I look into gender related practices and discourses among volunteers and draft dodgers and explore they ways in which they positioned themselves with respect to the “others” – “others” being other men and other women.

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