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2005 - International Studies Association Pages: 15 pages || Words: 4174 words || 
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1. Heins, Volker. "How to be Good: Ethical Foreign Policy in Britain and Germany, 1999-2004" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p69689_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper focuses on how political elites have drawn on collective memories and corresponding narratives to shape policies of intervention/ nonintervention from Kosovo to Iraq. An earlier glimpse of this can already be found in my paper Germany's New War: 11 Sept and Its Aftermath in German Quality Newspapers, German Politics, August 2002, pp. 128-145.

2004 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 8848 words || 
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2. Lee, Kyounghag. "How Do Work Attachment Strategies Influence Employment and Economic Status of Welfare Leavers in 1999?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p83800_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explores how different work attachment strategies of each state influence the employment and economic status of welfare leavers using the National Survey of America’s Family of 1999. The study explores this issue through logistic regression. First, it examines whether strict life-time limits and sanctions for noncompliance with work requirements are more likely than weak life-time limits and sanctions to influence the employment status and economic status of welfare leavers. Second, it examines whether high outcome of unsubsidized employment of each state are more likely than low outcome of unsubsidized employment of states to increase the employment and income status of welfare leavers. Finally, this study tries to find what factors significantly influence the employment and economic status of welfare leavers. This study finds that strict provision of life-time limits is more likely than weak provision to influence welfare leavers to have jobs. On the other hand, strict sanctions for noncompliance with work requirement are less likely than weak sanctions to increase the employment of welfare leavers. However, high outcome of unsubsidized employment of each state does not significantly relate to the employment and economic status of welfare leavers. The study contributes to our understandings of the impact of work attachment strategies on welfare leavers.

2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 39 words || 
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3. Lubecki, Jacek. "In the Shadow of the Bear: Polish-Russian Relations 1999-2005" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p140989_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: My paper examines Polish-Russian relations from the time of Poland joining NATO in 1999 to the crisis of summer 2005, when tensions between the countries escalated to the point of beatings of Polish diplomatic personnel in Moscow by "hooligans."

2006 - American Studies Association Words: 196 words || 
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4. Juris, Jeffrey. "Connecting the ‘Battle in Seattle’ to the World: Precedents and Antecedents in Transnational Networks of the 1999 Actions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113474_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper explores the interconnections among U.S.-based global justice networks and the rise of anti-corporate globalization struggles elsewhere across the world.

Nearly 50,000 people from across the world took to the streets to protest corporate globalization at the World Trade Organization (WTO) meetings in Seattle on November 30, 1999. A diverse coalition of environmental, labor, and economic justice activists shut down the meetings and prevented another round of trade liberalization talks. Media images of giant puppets, tear gas, and street clashes between protesters and police were broadcast worldwide, bringing the WTO and a novel form of collective action into view. On the one hand, the “Battle of Seattle” was the culmination of several years of transnational activist networking, including international forums such as Peoples Global Action and the Zapatista Encuentros. On the other hand, Seattle inspired similar actions around the world in cities such as Prague, Quebec, Barcelona, Genoa, Cancun, and Hong Kong. Indeed, global justice activists in distant locales have communicated via internet-based listserves, websites, and projects such as the Independent Media Center. The innovative networking technologies, forms, and practices developed in Seattle were thus shaped by and constitutive of emerging transnational fields of activism.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 11663 words || 
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5. Burland, Daniel. and Lundquist, Jennifer. "Evidence for the "Two Armies" Hypothesis? Data from the 1999 Survey of Active Duty Personnel" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p410281_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There is widespread consensus among empirical researchers and the military itself that the Army consists of two distinct cultural components, corresponding respectively to the combat arms and the support branches. This dualistic “Two Armies” concept has been supported by anecdotal evidence and also by empirical researchers utilizing qualitative methods. This paper is the first to examine the phenomenon quantitatively by using a nationally representative sample of the active duty population. It is also the first to attempt to understand whether the Two Armies culture, if it exists, is a function of pre- or post-military socialization, or both. We find that there is a statistically significant difference between support and combat soldiers that holds even after taking into account differing demography. Interestingly, this is true mainly of white soldiers, and we find that it is driven by pre-military, civilian socialization.

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