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2009 - ISA - ABRI JOINT INTERNATIONAL MEETING Pages: 25 pages || Words: 10952 words || 
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1. Teodósio Neto, Bianor. "Razão de Estado: A Política Externa do 1 Governo George W. Bush (2001-2005) No Pós-11 De Setembro de 2001" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA - ABRI JOINT INTERNATIONAL MEETING, Pontifical Catholic University, Rio de Janeiro Campus (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Jul 22, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p380838_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: George W. Bush’s first term (2001-2005) facing the events of September 11th of 2001 adopted a defensive foreign policy against terrorism in America which is based upon the concepts of Realism and State Reasons. The present study shows that these concepts were implemented through the visions of the Republican party and intellectuals called the hawks of north-american foreign policy. It also discourses on the Afghanistan and Iraq campaigns and shows that George W. Bush’s government foreign policy adopts unilateral postures and interrupted the past paradigm of multilateralism used on the Bill Clinton’s Democrat government. Further, it analyses the internal reality of The United States, evidencing that the present reality on the international level has affected the internal level, and the State defense justification opens precedents to the rights, before considered as undeniable, to be suppressed.

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 34 pages || Words: 10181 words || 
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2. Sanders, David., Clarke, Harold., Stewart, Marianne. and and, Paul. "The 2001 British Election Study Internet Poll: a Methodological Experiment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p66295_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper reports on the findings of the Internet component of the 2001 BES and compares them with those of the other BES pre-election surveys. Part 1 of the paper provides a brief outline of the rationale that underpins the introduction of Internet polling as a supplement to more traditional methods of assessing mass public opinion. Part 2 describes the marginal distributions on the key dependent variable - the projected vote shares of the main political parties - of the three pre-election polls that were conducted using BES questionnaires. Intriguingly, the (unweighted) Internet-based poll provided a better guess of the actual vote shares in the subsequent election than either of the two conventional polls. Part 3 provides a more detailed comparison of the profiles of the face-to-face and Internet-based polls. It shows how the Internet poll, compared with the face-to-face poll, was skewed demographically towards the professional classes and politically towards the Conservative Party. Part 4 explores the extent to which the use of the Internet poll might result in spurious causal inferences being drawn about the sources of voting preferences in the 2001 UK election. A simple, direct-effects causal model is estimated using both the face-to-face probability sample data and the Internet survey data. The model is tested using a variety of weighting algorithms. The results suggest that, although the raw probability and Internet samples differ significantly, the relationships among the key variables do not differ significantly across the two samples. We conclude that Internet polling has an important part to play in gauging and analysing public opinion in future elections.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 7861 words || 
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3. Halvorsen, Anne-Lise. "Prayer, Fear and Focus on Patriotism/Diversity: Three Elementary Schools’ Responses to September 11, 2001" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107486_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The events of September 11, 2001 forced Americans to personally confront trauma, fears and questions about death, global relations, humanity and the role of America in the world. School-age children were not immune from this media-saturated event. Educators and interested members of the public have conflicting opinions about the role of September 11 in elementary classrooms. My research question is, to what extent do schools and teachers, particularly in their social studies curriculum, differ in their approaches immediately following the event, as well as toward the commemoration of September 11? This paper involves the study of three elementary schools of varying religious backgrounds and different social compositions, concerning their educational approaches toward the events of September 11. The goal is to provide glimpses into the philosophies and missions of these schools by studying how teachers’ and principals’ reactions to September 11 played out in the classroom and in the school. Within this goal, I study equity among the three schools in terms of opportunities to learn about the world. My findings were multifaceted: they showed 1) that none of the schools responded in overt ways to the events of September 11; 2) that the religious nature of schools did affect how and what schools taught in response to September 11 and 3) that how a school responds to an event like September 11 is a provocative way to discover the culture or underlying philosophy of a school.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 7500 words || 
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4. Peek, Lori. "Community Isolation and Group Solidarity: Examining the Muslim Student Experience After September 11, 2001" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107464_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the Muslim experience following the events of September 11, 2001. I begin by reviewing the literature regarding post-disaster communities, with a specific focus on community cohesion, and isolation, following natural and technological disasters and intentional acts of violence. Next, I discuss the setting in which this study was conducted, the research participants, and the methods that were used. I then explicate several reasons why Muslim university students in New York City often felt excluded from the therapeutic community which emerged after the September 11 attacks. The group solidarity that developed among Muslims in response to this exclusion is detailed. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the sociological implications of post-disaster isolation as well as suggestions for future disaster research.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 6583 words || 
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5. Kim, KiDeuk. "Exploratory Study on Social Contagion of Crime: Results from Chicago homicide data from 1998 to 2001" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2018-12-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110441_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Contagion can be defined as a process by which a disease, behavior, or mood transmits from one person to the next. Following a few pioneering studies on the contagious nature of violence, prolific efforts have evolved to understand the temporal fluctuations or spatial spread of crime. Despite a growing interest in social contagion, existent research has been neglectful of the linkage between theoretical accounts of social contagion and empirical evidence supporting temporal fluctuations or spatial distribution of crime. The current paper examines one of the mechanisms by which social contagion of crime can be further elaborated. The main proposition of this study is that population density, ethnic homogeneity, and the concentration of social transactions will facilitate the process of social contagion, which, in turn, explains temporal change or spatial spread of crime. Utilizing trajectory modeling and spatial econometric modeling, the study presents a theoretical framework for and empirical evidence of the contagious nature of crime.

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