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2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 39 words || 
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1. Andary, Dunia. "Iraq 2004: Countervailing Messages and Public Support for the President's Handling of Iraq in the 2004 Election" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85053_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using time-series, I evaluate support for the president?s handling of Iraq during the 2004 election. I examine how success or failure, defined by members of the political and media elite, influence public evaluations of the president?s Iraq policy.

2005 - American Association For Public Opinion Association Words: 149 words || 
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2. baldassare, mark. "After the California Recall: Governor's Ratings, 2004 Election Choices, and the Implications for Direct Democracy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association For Public Opinion Association, Fontainebleau Resort, Miami Beach, FL, <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p12215_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper/Poster Proposal
Abstract: California's historic recall election in October 2003 resulted in the removal of an incumbent Democratic governor and his replacement by GOP candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger. This paper analyzes a series of largescale public opinion surveys conducted by the Public Policy Institute of California during Governor Schwarzenegger's first year in office in seeking to answer the following questions: (1) how did the public's attitudes toward their governor's performance in office, trust in state government, and perceptions of the state of the state change over time?; (3) to what degree did attitudes change toward the recall process and direct democracy?; (4) is there a relationship between the governor's ratings and attitudes toward use of the recall process?; and (5) is there a link between the governor's ratings, attitudes toward the recall, and 2004 election choices? The paper discusses the implications of the California recall for the future use of direct democracy.

2005 - American Association For Public Opinion Association Words: 241 words || 
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3. Stewart, Kate., Russonello, John . and Sternfeld, Rachel. "Understanding the Catholic Vote in 2004" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association For Public Opinion Association, Fontainebleau Resort, Miami Beach, FL, <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p16800_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper/Poster Proposal
Abstract: Catholic voters comprise 27% of the electorate. They have been a key voting group since the early 1970’s. In every presidential election since then, the candidate that wins the Catholic vote has won the popular vote. The 2004 election is of particular interest to look at the Catholic vote because the Catholic clergy became much more involved in politics than ever before to energize social conservatives. While Kerry lost the Catholic vote to Bush by five percentage points (47% to 52%), the message the Bishops were preaching about morality did not inspire all Catholic voters. In the exit poll data, moral issues ranked third, behind terrorism and jobs as the reason Catholics chose one candidate over the other.

This paper will examine the Catholic vote in the 2004 Presidential election. We will look at subgroups of Catholic voters – women, men, conservatives, liberals, moderates, church attenders and many other groups – to provide a profile of the Catholic voter. The paper will also explore why Catholics voted the way they did and the potential impact the Bishops may have had in this election. The paper will use the 2004 exit poll data as well as a survey among Catholic voters that BRS conducted in July 2004 among 2,223 likely Catholic voters. This survey asked not only intentions of voting but the importance of issues to voters and the influence of the Bishops on voting decisions and contained an oversample of Hispanic Catholics.

2005 - American Association For Public Opinion Association Words: 291 words || 
Info
4. Rademacher, Eric., Minser, Jason. and Downing, Kim. "“Did Ballot Order Matter at ‘The Epicenter’?” : An Evaluation of Candidate Ballot Order Effects in the 2004 Ohio Elections" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association For Public Opinion Association, Fontainebleau Resort, Miami Beach, FL, <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p17226_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper/Poster Proposal
Abstract: In Ohio, the so-called ‘Epicenter’ of the 2004 national elections, did the order in which presidential candidate names were read matter in the levels of support they received in telephone surveys?
Researchers conducting pre-election surveys by telephone often administer multiple forms of trial heat questions that rotate the order in which candidate names are presented. In Ohio, the University of Cincinnati’s Ohio Poll uses this practice because
1) codified directives mandate rotation of candidate order on Election Day ballots and 2) research has shown that formulating research designs sensitive to the potential for response order effects improves pre-election measures of voter preferences (see, e.g. Rademacher and Smith, 2001; Visser et al. 2000; Miller and Krosnick 1998).
In this research, we examine whether ballot order impacted voter preference distributions in telephone surveys conducted in a state widely portrayed as one of the key battlegrounds in the race for the presidency. During the 2004 election campaign the University of Cincinnati’s Institute for Policy Research conducted telephone surveys designed to measure voter preferences in statewide races for president and U. S. Senate. These surveys included numerous ballot order experiments.
While the 2004 race for the presidency in Ohio was highly competitive, and received a great deal of campaign and media attention, the race for U.S. Senate was not competitive, and was relegated to the equivalent of a “down-ticket” race as a result. Analyses will examine the impact ballot order had on reported vote preferences in these two contests for president and U.S. Senate. In addition, we will also report the results of ballot order experiments in various types of races, including for president and U.S. Senate, conducted using the Ohio Poll in 2000 and 2002.

2005 - American Association For Public Opinion Association Words: 269 words || 
Info
5. Bason, James. "Young Cell Phone Users and Voting Behavior in Georgia in 2004" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association For Public Opinion Association, Fontainebleau Resort, Miami Beach, FL, <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p15859_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper/Poster Proposal
Abstract: Prior to the 2004 general election, some political observers suggested that public opinion pollsters may have underestimated support for Democrat John Kerry due to cell phone only users, primarily young, urban first time voters. Zukin (2004), based on Edison/Mitosfsky exit poll data, has suggested that this supposition was largely unfounded, as the 30 and under age group split 54 percent for Kerry and 45 percent for Bush, numbers very close to the results obtained by Zogby in a text message study among 120,000 cell phone users subscribed to a MTV Rock the Vote text message mailing group.

The current research examines voting behavior of a random sample of 2,000 University of Georgia students during November 2004 to determine the voting behavior of cell phone only users during the 2004 general election. Using a web based survey instrument, respondents were asked a variety of items related to political attitudes, including voting behavior during the 2004 general election. Respondents were also asked to indicate cell phone usage patterns. The unique nature of the study will also allow comparison of University of Georgia students' voting behavior following the general election to a voting behavior of a similar age group of prior to the general election in a statewide RDD telephone survey conducted just three weeks before the election.

It is generally assumed that cell phone only users are primarily young people, so using a sample of undergraduate students at a major state university will allow us to directly test this assumption, as well as determine if the group of cell phone only users differed from non-cell phone only users during the 2004 general election.

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