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2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 63 words || 
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1. Robinson, Matt. "Drug War Lies 2005: White House Shenanigans in the 2005 National Drug Control Strategy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2019-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p32367_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper critically examines claims-making by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) in its 2005 National Drug Control Policy. The author shows how the ONDCP misuses statistics, inappropriately interprets trend data, and leaves out important information in order to show its drug war is effective, even when almost all of the relevant data show that it is not.

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
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2. de la Garza, Rodolfo. "Latinos in the 2005 Mayoral Election in New York City" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152086_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
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3. Dyck, Joshua. "The Nature and Limits of Support for Direct Democracy: California???s Experience with the 2005 Special Election" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152310_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6003 words || 
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4. Ramirez, Ricardo. and Wong, Janelle. "Latinos and Asians in the 2005 Mayoral Race in Los Angeles" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152084_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: How does one explain the diverging voter preferences of Latinos and Asian American voters in the 2005 Mayoral election in Los Angeles? Some posit that Latino support for Villaraigosa was driven by a desire of Latino voters to elect a co-ethnic candidate. Hahn’s support among Asian Americans was most often attributed to active mobilization of the Asian American community by the Hahn campaign. We show that these explanations are incomplete. Moreover, popular explanations of Latino vote choice present an oversimplified portrait of the group’s voting behavior because they tend to be preoccupied with the role of racial cues at the expense of considering other factors, such as rational candidate evaluation. Co-ethnic voting among Latinos certainly provides some explanation for the patterns observed in 2005. But there were other factors influencing Latino vote choice left largely unexamined by observers. We also contend that mobilization mattered for the Asian Americans’ support for Hahn, but not in the manner assumed by most pundits and reporters.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 7666 words || 
Info
5. Luks, Samantha. and Rivers, Douglas. "Information Processing and the Voting Decision in a Low-Information Environment: Initiative Voting in the 2005 California Election" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-10-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p150858_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to understand how voters decide in the face of conflicting and sometimes intentionally confusing information. Using the example of two competing prescription drug propositions in the 2005 California Special Election, we show that most people were not even minimally aware of the basic conflict between the two propositions. Furthermore, while we show that individuals did use information shortcuts in forming opinions about the two propositions, when beliefs about the propositions were incorrect, they appear to have strongly influenced voting preferences. As a result, many people may have voted against their interests in the election. We also demonstrate, somewhat paradoxically, that industry groups were considerably more successful in confusing their own supporters—conservative voters—than their likely opponents—liberal voters.

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