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2008 - WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION Pages: 36 pages || Words: 10622 words || 
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1. Craig, Carolyn. "Framing Immigration Reform, Framing Immigrants: An Analysis of Newspaper Coverage of Immigration Reform August 2005, April 2006, and October 2006" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, Manchester Hyatt, San Diego, California, Mar 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p238084_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper analyzes newspaper coverage of immigration reform in mainstream English-language newspapers prior to, and following passage of immigration reform legislation by the US House of Representatives in December, 2005. The purpose of this project is twofold: 1) To illuminate the media’s participation in the social construction of the policy “problem” and acceptable “solutions” to it; 2) To illuminate how the social construction of the policy problem and solution contributes to the social construction of a particular group of people in America, namely Latino immigrants. The analysis presented here is based upon a qualitative analysis of a large random sample of newspaper articles published in the northeast and southwest United States during August 2005, April 2006, and October 2006. The analysis reveals both consistency and significant changes in the news coverage of immigration reform between April 2005 and October 2006. I discuss two key findings at length. First, changes in coverage between August 2005 and October 2006 portray an expansion in the terms of the debate about immigration reform that has proven significant in the course of the policy’s development. Second, while many articles fail to explain the need for immigration reform, the coverage generally portrays the problem as “illegal immigrants” from south of the US-Mexican border. This portrayal contributes to the social construction of Latinos as the Other. This project therefore enhances our understanding of the social construction of immigration policy and its subjects, and the print media’s contribution to this process.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 7731 words || 
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2. Baker, Andy. "Social Networks in the 2006 Mexican Elections: Why is Voting Behavior so Regionalized in Mexico? Political Discussion and Electoral Choice in 2006" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152683_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: Why is Mexican politics divided between conservative, northern “blue” states and left-learning, southern “yellow” states? While factors such as the regional concentration of wealth and urbanization certainly contribute, I suggest that political discussion plays an important role in reinforcing regional differences. Mexico’s regional cleavage limits the supply of differently-minded conversation partners in a voter’s immediate social environment, thus making it less likely that s/he will hear arguments sympathetic to an opposing side.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 9159 words || 
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3. McClintock, Cynthia. "Plurality versus Majority Runoff Rules for the Election of the President in Latin America: Insights from the 2006 Peruvian and Mexican Elections" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152748_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: Scholars' dire predictions about the negative effects of the runoff rule in Latin America are not borne out in this study. While runoff rules are associated with a larger number of political parties, a larger number of parties is not necessarily problematical; if the number is problematical, a smaller number may be achieved through threshold rules for seats in the legislature. In most Latin American elections, there is probably little to gain or lose from either electoral rule; the impact of these rules on party alliances and on outsiders does not appear to be very significant. However, in certain elections, such as the 2006 Peruvian and Mexican elections, where voters were quite equally divided among three or more candidates and one or more of these candidates was at a political extreme, the runoff rule is advantageous. In the cases, the runoff rule helps to achieve the election of a president who is closer to the political center and more legitimate.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 14 pages || Words: 4243 words || 
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4. Blais, André., Everitt, Joanna., Fournier, Patrick., Gidengil, Elisabeth. and Nevitte, Neil. "Perceptions and Evaluations of Minority Government in the 2006 Canadian Election" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p210100_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: ABSTRACT

The paper examines Canadians’ views about minority governments, using the 2006 Canadian Election Study. A plurality of Canadian voters thinks that minority governments are a good thing, a substantial change of mind compared to the 60s and 70s. As expected Liberal and Conservative identifiers are more prone to dislike minority governments while NDP and Bloc partisans are more inclined to like them. The better informed are more likely to have an opinion but being more informed does not lead in one particular direction. Liking or disliking minority governments does not seem to have any independent effect on vote choice. Satisfaction with democracy increased slightly more after the election among those who like minority governments. The effect is weak and confined to the most sophisticated fraction of the electorate.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 38 pages || Words: 9853 words || 
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5. Cohen, Jeffrey. and Fleisher, Richard. "Global and Specific Opinion and Senator Roll Call Voting: The Case of Immigration Policy, 2006" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p211973_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: An emerging consensus argues that that policy makers pay attention to citizen preferences when building public policies. But do legislators respond more to their constituent’s global public orientations, such as ideology, or to their constituents’ opinion on the specific issue at hand? Whether legislators respond to global or specific constituency opinion has implications for democracy and the ability of the public to hold its policy makers accountable. Lack of data has kept researchers from assessing which type of responsiveness more strongly figures into legislator decision making. Using newly available surveys across the 50 states, which ask respondents about specific attitudes towards immigration as well as global political orientations, we test for the comparative impact of specific versus global attitudes on Senate roll call voting on immigration. We find that both types of opinion affect senator roll call behavior about equally. Our conclusion discusses the conditions under which specific attitudes about policies might affect legislative policy making decisions and implications for democracy.

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