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2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 16 pages || Words: 7200 words || 
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1. Hayes, Terrell. "Poster 26. Community - Police Collaborations: Implications for Community Development Efforts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104445_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: The West End neighborhood in High Point, NC is one of several racially diverse, working-class neighborhoods that make up part of a larger area known as Core City. Despite having only 30 percent of the city’s population, Core city accounts for nearly 70 percent of all crime in the city. In an effort to assist local residents in reclaiming their neighborhood from drug dealers, the High Point Police Department launched the West End Initiative in May 2004. The West End Initiative represents an innovative approach to dealing with drug related crimes by permitting offenders one last chance, with the assistance of the community, to disassociate from their criminal activities. This poster presentation reports on the collaborative efforts of residents, community leaders, community organizations and police over the past two years to reduce drug-related crime in the West End. Drawing from both primary (a self-administered survey, focus groups, participation observation) and secondary data (newspaper stories, census data, unpublished reports) I examine the implications these efforts have had to date and will likely have in the future, on community development efforts in the West End.

2006 - International Studies Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 10773 words || 
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2. Franke, Ulrich. "When 26 become One. Analyzing NATO as NATO" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p99346_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Almost sixty years after its foundation, the question of what NATO is still preoccupies a lot of IR scholars. Common characterizations range from alignment over alliance to security community, and from United Nations? subcontractor to an instrument of maintaining Western predominance by military means.Puzzling enough, especially the rationalist-inspired accounts of NATO leave aside the important question of what the appropriate level of analysis is. But making statements about NATO requires taking NATO as NATO seriously.Obviously, NATO is constituted by its member states, but as a structure that enables coordinated, common and collective action, it always produces effects of a genuine quality that cannot be grasped entirely from a perspective that reduces international institutions to mere products of states? willingness to co-operate and to pursue their own interests.Analyzing NATO as NATO means to examine the secretary-general?s as well as the North Atlantic Council?s capacity of creative action.The paper will illustrate the theoretical and methodological implications of the suggested perspective by focusing on NATO?s policy on the devastating situation in Sudan which might become the occasion for the institution?s first engagement in Africa, thereby finally manifesting its latent influence on North-South relations.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 310 words || 
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3. Higgins, Monica. and Martin, Jennifer. "26. New Immigrant Survey (NIS), Office of Population Research, Princeton University" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p273567_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: The New Immigrant Survey (NIS) s a multi-cohort prospective-retrospective panel survey of new legal immigrants to the United States based on probability samples of administrative records from the U.S. Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services. A survey pilot project (NIS-P) was carried out in 1996 to test sampling procedures, questionnaire design, and tracking procedures to inform the implementation of the full NIS.

The first full cohort (NIS-2003-1) was sampled during May through November of 2003, yielding data on 8,573 Adult Sample respondents, 4,336 spouses, and 1,072 children aged 8-12. The baseline survey was conducted from June 2003 to June 2004. The geographic sampling design takes advantage of the natural clustering of immigrants. It includes all top 85 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) and all top 38 counties, plus a random sample of MSAs and counties.

The NIS content includes the following information: demographic, health and insurance, migration history, living conditions, transfers, employment history, income, assets, social networks, religion, housing environment, and child assessment tests. At the present, follow-up interviews (NIS-2003-2) are conducted.

Purpose:
Immigration has a major impact on American society – it accounts for one-third of U.S. population growth, and the United States takes in more immigrants than all other countries combined. In perhaps no other area of public policy is there such a large gap between information needs and existing data. Immigration processes and immigration policy continue to be the subject of much political and scientific debate. What are the contributions and costs of immigrants to the economy? What is the relationship between legal and illegal immigration? What is known about the origins of legal immigrants, how many return to their home countries, and what factors affect their assimilation?
The main objective is to provide a public use database on new legal immigrants to the United States that can address scientific and policy questions about migration behavior and the impacts of migration.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 7028 words || 
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4. Perry, Adam. "Don’t Tread On Us: President Clinton’s Address to the Nation on the Strike on Iraq’s Intelligence Headquarters June 26, 1993" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p329161_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: On June 26, 1993, President Clinton ordered an attack against Baghdad in retaliation for an assassination plot against former President Bush. The military strike was Clinton’s first and came at a crucial time in his presidency. The rhetorical strategies of responsibility, cause and effect, and time were significant to Clinton’s case because Saddam Hussein was held responsible for the attacks, and the delay for the appropriate response was portrayed as the product of careful deliberation.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 196 words || 
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5. Rudo-Hutt, Anna. "Electroencephalogram Response to a Stressor at Age 16 Predicts Delinquency Status at Age 26" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p431627_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Researchers have noted a number of abnormalities in the waking electroencephalogram (EEG) of individuals who exhibit criminal or antisocial behavior, and it has been suggested that these abnormalities reflect altered brain activity that may be at the basis of criminal behavior. Previous research using data from the Pittsburgh Youth Study found that adolescents who were delinquent at age 16 showed an increase in their EEG stress response. The current study examined whether the same EEG measures predicted which of these participants would be delinquent at age 26. EEG was measured at age 16 during baseline, a stressor task, and a final rest period. Participants were divided into four groups based on their level of self-reported delinquency at age 26: none, minor, moderate, or severe. Preliminary results indicated that the four groups differed in activity in the slow delta, delta, and beta1 frequency bands. In particular, the EEG pattern across the rest and stress conditions differed by group in the slow delta and beta1 bands such that the moderate group showed a large increase in EEG power during stress compared to the other groups. The results are discussed in relation to other psychophysiological findings in antisocial groups.

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