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2010 - ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 257 words || 
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1. Livert, David. and Martin, Daniela. "SDO Abroad: The Bidirectional Relationship between Social Hierarchy Orientation and the Study Abroad Experience" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting, Mark Hopkins Hotel, San Francisco, California, USA, Jul 07, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p420096_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the bidirectional role of social dominance orientation (SDO, Sidanius & Pratto, 1999) in the undergraduate education abroad experience. In prior research, SDO was correlated with prejudicial attitudes that hinder intergroup contact and understanding; what is not clear, however, is what contextual influences accentuate or attenuate this orientation (Huddy, 2004). We report findings from an ongoing longitudinal study comparing cohorts of Penn State University students studying abroad with their campus-based counterparts. Longitudinal data was collected at the beginning and end of the fall 2009 and spring 2010 semesters. Preliminary findings suggest that political orientation plays an important role in the study abroad experience. Students who chose to study abroad were lower on measures of SDO, symbolic racism, and had a greater motivation to engage in intercultural contact than their on-campus peers. Over the course of a semester abroad, students became more oriented toward their host country through reduced intergroup anxiety and increased perspective-taking. Levels of SDO at the outset of the experience conditioned how the intercultural context impacted the student. Low SDO students showed greater increases in universality: the belief in the commonality of all human experiences (Fuertes at al, 2000). In contrast, high SDO students underwent a significant decrease in SDO as a result of the semester-long experience. This study provides a novel examination of how political orientation can shape the effects of intergroup contact while being conditioned by that experience. Further, it helps us better understand the impact of educational diversity experiences on student development.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 233 words || 
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2. Cantu, Elizabeth. "Connections Abroad: Social Networking and Identity Formation as U.S. Students Study Abroad" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p367093_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Scholars studying issues of identity with students studying outside their comfort zone have found that studying abroad challenges students to partake in cross-cultural interactions while encountering oneself, especially one’s national identity (Dolby, 2007; Dolby, 2004). Limited research exists on how U.S. students studying abroad negotiate their identities in a context that causes their identity to be influx. The use of new media as a means of creating and recreating identities within the context of cross-cultural transitions is a largely untapped area of study, yet it is proliferating as technology reduces the size of the world and increases abilities to communicate often and richly with members of the home culture. Using theoretical frameworks from sojourner literature, identity literature and computer-mediated communication, this paper analyzes 14 interviews with students during a communication abroad program in Scotland, Ireland and England, and focuses on the role that social networking sites and the engagement of U.S. media products played in negotiating their identities. One interesting aspect of this research is the potential for optimistic bias about adaptation to be created by and maintained through constant mediated contact with home culture friends and family. Through this analysis, the need for further research of computer-mediated communication and identity formation while studying abroad is identified, and the role of social networking within the adaptation process is revisited with respect to theories of technology and new media.

2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 246 words || 
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3. Liu, Tzu-kai. "Study Abroad Fever: Questioning the Qualities (suzhi) of Chinese Study Abroad Students in China’s News Media" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p659231_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In recognizing the surge of Chinese international students in American universities in the aftermath of global financial crisis since 2008, this paper examines the discourse of study abroad in the PRC news media, and explores the linkages between public media discourse and the qualities of Chinese students. It asks how the “quality” (suzhi) discourse is intrinsically connected with the media discussion of whether or not pursuing study abroad experiences at American universities. It explains what kinds of quality youth are imagined and which features of their qualities are raised and circulated in the media discourse. Grounded in a milieu governed by global, neoliberal foreign higher education, the PRC news media depicts study abroad as a path for high school students to relieve themselves from the pressures of college entrance exam. Yet, the news reports have criticized the increasing body of high school students, who are not taking that exam, and interpreted their action as detrimental to the measurement of quality of Chinese student. Meanwhile, this paper explores the media’s concerns over whether or not “study abroad returnees” (haigui) still have any advantages. I argue that the 2008-2012 PRC news media has shifted its attentions from the discourse of meritocracy to the discourse of mediocrity. By emphasizing the linkage between media discourse and the quality discourse in China, I further argue that Chinese media’s concern over study abroad has increasingly and critically intersected with the discussions of individual moral becoming and the “insufficient” qualities of Chinese youth.

2012 - MWERA Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 2015 words || 
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4. Derby, Dustin. and Schrad, Julie. "Clinic Abroad: The Development and Pilot Assessment of a cocurricular Chiropractic Clinical Abroad Program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MWERA Annual Meeting, Hilton Orrington Hotel, Evanston, Illinois, Nov 07, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p600423_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although the current CAS standards have broadened to address graduate and professional schools, omitted from their additions are specific standards for the assessment of clinically-based programs. The purpose of this paper is to outline the development process and pilot assessment of a chiropractic clinical cocurricular program. Results indicated significant education gains across eight learning outcome scales via pre and post survey testing. In addition, all other operational and programmatic outcomes were met.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 165 words || 
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5. DeClair, Edward. "The EU, Study Abroad and Experiential Learning: Study Abroad Adventures beyond Language Acquisition" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251988_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Students do indeed learn by doing. Over the last four years, I have taught EU Politics through a study abroad course that actually takes the students to the EU. Prior to departure, the students spend an entire week study the politics, history, and organization of the EU. The week of lectures, readings and group projects ends with the group's departure for Europe. During their time in Europe, students continue to complete reading assignments, meet in groups and individually with the instructor, and participate in briefings at EU or EU-related offices. Students routinely report that the "being there" function of their learning enhances their ability to inculcate course material; moreover, they just find it to be a lot more intriguing and engaging. Students also report that their on-going dialogues with EU citizens while traveling in Europe further enhance the learning experience. This paper will report on various models for incorporating this in the curriculum and will provide student feedback as to the value of the experience.

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