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2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 5800 words || 
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1. Barnes, Rebecca. "When is abuse not abuse?: Women's definitions of abuse in female same-sex relationships" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p103078_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper, I use the findings from my qualitative research into partner abuse in female same-sex relationships to shed light upon some of the complexities of women’s definitions of abuse in same-sex intimate relationships. Forty women took part in semi-structured, in-depth interviews, in one of the first qualitative studies of violence and abuse in female same-sex relationships in the United Kingdom. Whilst all of these women self-identified as having been abused in a previous same-sex relationship, there were cases where a certain act was defined as abusive by some participants, but where a similar act in similar circumstances was not defined as abusive by other participants. This paper examines some of the ways in which women define abuse in intimate relationships, and the factors which contribute to how women form decisions about these definitions. The ways in which women minimize and normalize abuse is explored, in addition to women’s views of the relevance of the labels of ‘victim’ and ‘perpetrator’ to their experiences. The findings which I share indicate that the boundaries of violence and abuse in intimate relationships have the potential to be much more ambiguous and blurry than widely held dichotomies of violent/non-violent, innocent/guilty and victim/perpetrator imply, calling for a more textured analysis of violence and abuse in all types of intimate relationships.

2012 - Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 150 words || 
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2. Millard, Michelle. "Why I Couldn’t/Didn’t Call it Abuse: Languaging Aggression, Violence, and Abuse in A Lesbian Relationship." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 16, 2012 <Not Available>. 2020-02-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p558434_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This autoethnography interrogates the role and lack of language within the dominant discourses of domestic violence that often excludes LGBT individuals. The discourse where “he” is the perpetrator, “she” is the victim/survivor, and its called spousal/marital/wife abuse. This self-reflexive journey is me trying to traverse/interrupt these discourses in an effort to include my “othered” experiences of domestic abuse. According to this dominant discourse, what I experienced wasn’t really domestic abuse because women aren’t abusive/violent, they can’t cause damage, and in the end it was just a “cat fight.” There are more questions than answers: can these experiences fit into my constructions and moments of identity? Because it wasn’t my husband hitting me, is it domestic abuse or something else? Can I be a victim? Can I be considered a survivor? Can me and the sexuality that I identify as become part of the discourse or does it belong somewhere else?

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 174 words || 
Info
3. Mercado, Cynthia., Terry, Karen. and Massey, Christina. "Correlates of Clergy Sexual Abuse: Implications for the Prevention of Sexual Abuse in Institutional Settings" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Nov 14, 2012 <Not Available>. 2020-02-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p578117_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined how developmental history, sexual identity, prior sexual behavior, and use of pornography were related to sexual offenses against minors committed by Catholic priests. Using archival data (N = 1,116), clergy who offended against minors were compared with control groups of clergy who engaged in other sexual misconduct, had general mental health problems, or who had no identified sexual or general mental health issues. Preliminary results suggest that clergy who had consensual sexual experiences with men were not more likely to abuse minors while those with a history of childhood sexual abuse were more likely to be perpetrators. Those who had an absence of pre-seminary romantic dating partners and who sought opportunities to work with youth were more likely to have sexually abused children. Those who abused children were not, however, described as relating better to youth than those who had no known history of child abuse perpetration. The findings are discussed as they relate to the development of prevention-based policies in the Catholic Church and other institutional settings.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. David, Randal. and Scott, Katreena. "Analyzing Brief Father-Child Narratives to Understand How Abusive and Non-Abusive Men Perceive their Children" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p960937_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Word count - 499

Clinical research has indicated that batterers often are unable to paint a picture of their children as separate individuals with unique internal states and emotional needs (Bancroft & Silverman 2002; Scott & Crooks, 2004). Instead, they appear to view their children as extensions of themselves, which leads to a poor recognition of parent-child boundaries. In addition, qualitative research with abusive fathers has found that they express feelings of guilt, shame, remorse, and efforts both to take and deflect responsibility for the damaged they caused as fathers; they also felt undermined by internal and external forces, such as their childhood experiences and challenges with coparenting that diminished their presence and involvement in their children’s lives (Fox et al., 2001; Perel & Peled, 2008). At the same time, men consistently yearned for a closer and warmer fathering relationship with their children. This evidence illustrates the complexity of violent fathers’ perception of their children; hence, a more nuanced understanding of the mediators of the impact of domestically violent fathers on their children and the effect on their children’s development is needed. To this end, our work has involved the development of a coding scheme to analyze father-child narratives to provide insight into the thought process when fathers attempt to hold their child in their thoughts. This model was founded on both clinical and theoretical work on mind-mindedness and reflective functioning. Using this coding scheme, we hypothesized that, in addition to the typical association between abuse and negative child-centered statements, abusive fathers would make more self-centered comments in relationship to their child compared to non-abusive fathers. We further expected this relationship to persist even while controlling for father’s education, age, and level of in-person contact between fathers and children.
Eighty-five fathers were sampled from an ongoing longitudinal study investigating a variety of characteristics of fathers. Forty were recruited from the Partner Assault Program (PAR) at Family Service Toronto, a court mandated program for assaultive men. For the control group, forty-five fathers with no-self reported history of perpetrating domestic violence were recruited via online ads. Fathers were asked to talk, for three minutes, about their thoughts and feelings about the target child and how the two of them get along together. The developed coding scheme consisted of four main comment categories: egocentric, self-centered in relationship to child, child-centered, and father-child relationship – the latter two were coded by valence. It was measured by complete utterances and trained to two judges, which had high interrater reliability (Cohen’s κ = 0.75-1.00).
Our results show that fathers who reported high levels of childhood trauma made more negative child-centered comments, r =.24, n = 83, p < .05, two tails; differences between groups and self-centered comments in relationship to child are presented in Table 1. The present findings indicate that abusive fathers have difficulties separating their physical and mental state from their child compared to non-abusive fathers, supporting clinical work on domestic violence. Young and uneducated fathers with less contact also have difficulties, supporting the parenting and developmental psychology literature.

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