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2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 5800 words || 
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1. Barnes, Rebecca. "When is abuse not abuse?: Women's definitions of abuse in female same-sex relationships" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p103078_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper, I use the findings from my qualitative research into partner abuse in female same-sex relationships to shed light upon some of the complexities of women’s definitions of abuse in same-sex intimate relationships. Forty women took part in semi-structured, in-depth interviews, in one of the first qualitative studies of violence and abuse in female same-sex relationships in the United Kingdom. Whilst all of these women self-identified as having been abused in a previous same-sex relationship, there were cases where a certain act was defined as abusive by some participants, but where a similar act in similar circumstances was not defined as abusive by other participants. This paper examines some of the ways in which women define abuse in intimate relationships, and the factors which contribute to how women form decisions about these definitions. The ways in which women minimize and normalize abuse is explored, in addition to women’s views of the relevance of the labels of ‘victim’ and ‘perpetrator’ to their experiences. The findings which I share indicate that the boundaries of violence and abuse in intimate relationships have the potential to be much more ambiguous and blurry than widely held dichotomies of violent/non-violent, innocent/guilty and victim/perpetrator imply, calling for a more textured analysis of violence and abuse in all types of intimate relationships.

2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Words: 174 words || 
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2. Watkins, William. "Motivations, Predictors, And Risk Factors Of ADHD Medication Abuse: A Study In Abuser Typology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, Nov 13, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p208168_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: Prescription ADHD medication has been shown to be on the rise as a drug of abuse among young people. Unlike other drugs that serve only the purpose of achieving a high, this particular substance can be perceived as useful and beneficial by those who abuse it. It is these positive attributes given to the illicit use of these drugs that make them so dangerous, especially in the hands of youths. Using a national sample of 12th grade students, this study looks at what motivations exist among youths for the illicit use of ADHD medication. Warning signs and predictors of such abuse behavior are also examined as a means to identify youths who would be at risk to engage in illicit use of these substances. This study looks to build on existing literature regarding ADHD medication abuse by expanding what we know about those who abuse these substance beyond basic bio-demographical characteristics and commonly known motivations for their use. Suggestions for future research and policy implications are also discussed.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 10 pages || Words: 1847 words || 
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3. Patterson, George. "Predictors of Attitudes Toward Child Physical Abuse, Sexual Abuse and Neglect" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104817_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The attitudes that professionals have toward victims and perpetrators of child physical abuse, sexual abuse and neglect may have a negative effect on the interventions that are provided to child victims and parents perpetrators of abuse. Previous research suggests those professionals who express negative attitudes such as anger, sadness, disgust, or discomfort toward an abusive parent could be so overwhelmed with affect that they may experience difficulty providing objective support or other interventions to parents that perpetrate the abuse or investigating the abuse as a crime. This paper provides the results of four regression models that were used to predict both positive and negative attitudes towards abused children and abusive parents. Results show that females reported more positive emotions toward an abused child than did males (β = .187, p < .05), females also reported more negative emotions toward an abused child than did males (β = .209, p = .01), and African Americans and Latinos reported fewer positive emotions toward the abusive parent than did whites (β = -.172, p < .05). The negative and positive attitudes held by mandated reporters of child abuse are discussed with the implications for changing professional attitudes.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 234 words || 
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4. Outlaw, Maureen. "Abuse as the Motive for Abuse Problems in the Assessment of the ‘Control Motive’" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, Nov 15, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p34083_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Much recent attention has been brought to bear on the motive to control and its role in intimate partner violence (Felson and Messner, 2001; Johnson, 1999; Outlaw, 2001). Although arguably one of the most important risk factors for violence (Johnson, 1999; Outlaw, 2001), use of current measures of ‘coercive control’ obscures potentially important distinctions between methods of control, which in other contexts are considered types of abuse in their own right. Specifically, such measures tend to include items such as whether a current partner “limits your access to the family income,” “limits your contact with family and friends,” and/or “makes you feel inadequate” (Tjaden and Thoennes, 1998). In other works, these items can easily be understood as reflecting economic, social, and emotional abuse, respectively (Miller, 1995). Although not inaccurate to conceptualize these behaviors as also reflecting strategies of coercive control, doing so may mask important differences in their relationship(s) to violence. The current study therefore disentangles the multiple types of nonviolent abuse/control to examine the effects of each on the frequency and severity of physical violence by intimate partners. Using Tjaden and Thoennes’(1998) Violence and Threats of Violence against Women and Men in the United States, 1994-1996 survey data, each type of abuse and their combinations are examined in terms of their impact on the risks of physical violence against intimate partners. Implications for research are discussed.

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