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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Pan, Jingtong., Donlan, Alice. and Zaff, Jonathan. "The Role of Parent-Child and Teacher-Child Connectedness on Youth Academic Agency, Academic Engagement, and Academic Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955123_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Youth must be actively engaged with their academic activities in order to acquire the necessary knowledge and skills for future success (Wang & Eccles, 2013). A large body of research has found that academic engagement is critical to youth academic outcomes (e.g., Fall & Roberts, 2012; Fredricks, Blumenfeld, & Paris, 2004; Li, 2011).

Self-determination theories (Deci & Ryan, 1985), stage-environment fit theory (Eccles, 2004), and the self-systems model of motivation development (Skinner, Furrer, Marchand, & Kindermann, 2008) suggest that students have a fundamental desire to connect to others in social contexts, such as school and family. The extent to which a social context meets an individual’s needs for connectedness may influence his or her academic outcomes (Niehaus, Rudasill, & Rakes, 2012). Specifically, when the individual feels supported and connected, he or she will be more likely to develop a stronger sense of academic agency (Snyder et al., 1997). Furthermore, academic agency (being empowered to accomplish academic tasks) rooted in secure feelings of connectedness promotes intrinsic motivation towards academic activities, which translates into academic engagement (Wang & Eccles, 2013).

Teacher and parent connectedness have both been implicated in academic engagement, although the role of parent connectedness is less understood (e.g., Appleton et al., 2008; Fall & Roberts, 2012). In addition, few studies have investigated the extent to which connectedness predicts academic engagement and outcomes across time (e.g., Murray, 2009; Pietarinen et al., 2014). Finally, much research recognizes that there are different aspects of academic engagement (e.g., cognitive engagement and emotional engagement) but the relationship between them is less investigated (e.g., Fredricks et al., 2004; Reeve & Tseng, 2011; Wang & Eccles, 2013). However, the emerging literature suggests that emotional engagement manifested in the quality of relations with parents and teachers may fuel more active cognitive investment towards academic activities (e.g., Li & Lerner, 2012; Pietarinen et al., 2014).

The current study examines the extent to which youth’s academic agency mediates the link between youth-teacher and youth-parent connectedness and academic engagement, and, subsequently, academic outcomes. Two waves of survey data on teacher-student connectedness (α = .85), parent-student connectedness (α = .78), agency (α = .75), cognitive engagement (α = .85), and emotional engagement (α = .72) were collected from 6th through 8th graders attending three middle schools in a low-income, mid-sized urban community in the Northeastern United States (n = 392, 51.5% female; 77.0% White, 10.7% Black). District-wide standardized test scores were also collected at the end of each school year. From the results of a path analysis (see Figure 1), connectedness at Wave 1 significantly predicts youth academic engagement and academic outcomes at Wave 2 (γs range from .21 to .66, p < .05), and this relation is mediated by youth agency (Sobel test zs range from 2.35 to 6.38, p < .05). We also found evidence that emotional engagement predicted cognitive engagement. Implications for school and family-based practice will be discussed.

2006 - American Society of Criminology (ASC) Words: 52 words || 
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2. Southerland, Mittie. "Academic Certification: The Development of Standards and Transition from Academic Peer Review to Academic Certification" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p127078_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences approved Certification Standards and the process for Academic Certification of Criminal Justice programs in May of 2005. This paper traces the history of the movement from the late 1970s to present and contrasts the processes and outcomes of academic peer review with those of certification.

2015 - MWERA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Owens, Madeline. and Polydore, Catherine. "Students' Perceptions of Academic Advisor Effectiveness and its Relationship to Academic Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MWERA Annual Conference, Hilton Orrington Hotel, Evanston, IL, Oct 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1045716_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study utilized a quantitative causal-comparative and correlational approach to investigate the impact of academic advisors by measuring students’ perceptions of the effectiveness of their academic advisors’ job performance and how their perceptions related to the students’ level of success as measured by grade point average and consecutive semester enrollment. Participants were 767 traditional and non-traditional aged undergraduate students over 18 years of age enrolled at a mid-sized, Midwestern four-year state university during the spring 2015 semester who completed all 24-items on the modified effectiveness and importance instrument (Smith and Allen, 2006). Initial results suggests the existence of an effectiveness-importance gap as indicated by significant differences in mean students ratings. Additional results, discussion within Astin’s and Tinto’s models, and recommendations for student affairs professionals, are also presented.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 9658 words || 
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4. Wharton-Michael, Patty. "Academic vs. Professional Education: Epistmology and Journalism Educator's Academic Work" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 21, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297024_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study was designed to examine journalism and mass communication educators’ personal epistemology and its influence on their academic work as educators. A case study was conducted that examined nine journalism and mass communication faculty members from varying educational and background experiences. Three separate categories were used to classify the faculty members: academic, industry, and adjunct. The results identified unique epistemologies for the faculty groups. The faculty members in the academic group commonly illustrated epistemological assumptions grounded in contextual relativism, whereas faculty members from the industry and adjunct categories more often demonstrated epistemological assumptions rooted in dualism. The different epistemological assumptions influenced faculty members’ academic work. The implications for journalism and mass communication educations are discussed.

2017 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 191 words || 
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5. Fuller, Steve. "Beyond Academic Rentiership: Why Academic Knowledge is Not Naturally a Public Good But Needs to Be Made One" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston MA, Aug 30, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1272686_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Academics (and others) take for granted that knowledge is a public good, and because academics are normally seen as the primary knowledge producers in society, they are seen as by definition producers of public goods. However, this syllogism leaves a lot to be desired. In particular, it ignores the role of academic rentiership, which is captured in the high entry and access costs associated with the production and distribution of academic knowledge. These are in turn tied to a strongly path dependent epistemic sensibility that privileges (certainly in writing practices) ‘standing on the shoulders of giants’ over finding the shortest route to the top. I shall argue that while academics certainly do produce knowledge, the privileging of ‘research’ over ‘teaching’ in the academy effectively means that we produce knowledge as a club good, not a public good. I shall explore the consequences of this claim, including the prospect that we might need a version of a ‘cultural revolution’ within the academy that actively removes the access costs to knowledge which are largely imposed by a journal-driven culture which rewards relevance to a self-defined ‘cutting edge’ of research over the general public.

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