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2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 202 words || 
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1. Laws, Serena. "Access to Bankruptcy, Access to Justice: Attorney Access as a Factor in Bankruptcy Filing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p360399_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: T.H. Marshall famously conceived of citizenship as containing political, social and civil rights. Often forgotten is that Marshall’s “civil rights” not only includes freedom of speech, of the press, etc., but also equal access to the legal system. My paper explores this understudied connection between legal access and social rights in a particular policy area—bankruptcy filing. Filing for bankruptcy is an important avenue of relief for Americans in financial trouble, yet it is not equally accessible in part because it requires access to a lawyer. Using data from the Administrative Office of the Courts, the Legal Services Corporation, and the GSS, I construct a measure of legal access and assign a legal access score to all bankruptcy districts. First, I hypothesize that consumer bankruptcy filings will be higher in those districts with a higher legal access score. Second, I expect states with high levels of legal access to also have high levels of social rights. Third, I expect the ratio of Ch. 7 to Ch. 13 bankruptcy filings to be higher in areas with high levels of social rights. The analysis contributes not only to knowledge about bankruptcy but also emphasizes the important role of legal access in certain social policy areas.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 229 words || 
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2. Li, Xiaojun. "Bureaucratic Access and Policy Influence: Explaining Trade Liberalization during China's WTO Accession" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1189693_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: China’s historic entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO) was not preceded by democratic reform or fragmentation of power in the ruling party, factors suggested by scholars as crucial in creating space for pro-free trade groups to promote trade liberalization in developing and post-communist countries. How then did China manage to overcome strong domestic opposition to liberalization and wrap up bilateral negotiations with 37 WTO members leading up to its accession in 2001? This article offers an institutional explanation for trade liberalization, focusing on changes in the access of domestic groups to the policymaking process. Specifically, I argue that the Administrative Reform of 1998 was an institutional renovation that (1) significantly reduced protectionist pressures from domestic industries managed by ministries downgraded during the reform, and at the same time, (2) allowed Chinese negotiators to offer additional concessions in these industries in exchange for protection in those deemed more important by the state and/or under more pressures from the foreign governments. I find empirical support for this argument using data on China’s negotiated WTO tariff rates as well as internal memos recently declassified by the Chinese Ministry of Commerce and negotiation documents between China and the contracting parties. The findings not only shed new light on the trade policymaking process at a critical juncture in Chinese history, but also deepen our understanding of the politics of trade liberalization in non-democracies.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 34 pages || Words: 9054 words || 
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3. Reich, Zvi. "Citizen Journalism: Access to Writers Versus Access to Sources?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p229889_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The present study marks the first time that the day-to-day practices of citizen reporters are examined in an in-depth manner, to include the ways in which they avail themselves of sources and produce original news items. Moreover, the paper compares the methods and means of citizen reporters with those of their counterparts from the mainstream press. Data was gleaned from a series of reconstruction interviews in which reporters from Israeli citizen and mainstream news websites explained how they formulated their sampled items. The paper suggests a round-about version of the “news access” theory, whereby citizen journalists are hindered by their inferior access to news sources, unlike mainstream journalism, where the problem is the superior access of some of their sources to extensive and favored coverage. There are several symptoms for citizen reporters’ limited news access: their modest use of human sources; the high proportion of one-source items; their reluctance to interactively negotiate versions with sources; and the absence of established relations with most of their sources. Therefore, citizen reporters’ associations with sources tend to be ad hoc exchanges, rather than long-term role relationships. On the other hand, citizen reporters have adopted several mechanisms that help them make up for their comparably limited access. For example, they are much more likely to pursue stories at their own initiative. In addition, they tend to predicate their stories on firsthand witnessing, technical sources (mainly internet), personal acquaintances, and on their own experience.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 20 pages || Words: 6387 words || 
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4. Jenkins, Tania. "Arduous Access: Does Socio-Economic Status Affect Access to Primary Care in Quebec, Canada?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p308670_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A review of the extant literature indicates that there is an important dearth of research concerning access to primary care in Quebec specifically, given the province’s particularly troublesome number of people without doctors. Furthermore, while many studies concentrate on the effect of socioeconomic on utilisation rates of services, no study has considered its impact on the likelihood of having a regular source of care. As such, in order to address some of these gaps in the extant literature, this paper will ask whether there is a positive relationship between SES and the likelihood of having a family physician amongst Quebecers. Logistic regression was employed using odds ratios on data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (2005) in order to determine the different probabilities of having a regular medical doctor according to level of income and education. The effects of self-perceived health, age, sex, race and city of residence were also controlled for. Results indicate that low income negatively affects one’s chances of having a primary care practitioner in Quebec for those individuals making less than $30,000 in household income per year. Education, on the other hand, was not found to be significant. Health status and age were found to increase the likelihood of having a physician, whereas being male, non-white and living in Montreal were all found to be negatively associated with having a primary care doctor. In sum, disparities in access continue to exist in this province, despite universal healthcare coverage.

2007 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 58 pages || Words: 13063 words || 
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5. Cuillier, David. "Access attitudes: The importance of community engagement in support for press access to government records" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, The Renaissance, Washington, DC, Aug 08, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p204058_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Freedom of information laws often are strengthened or weakened in response to the public mood regarding personal privacy, national security, and other factors, yet little is known about how people think about access to public information. This study, based on a national phone survey, examines public attitudes toward press access to government records, identifying factors related to support and deriving a political model predicting support. Correlations, regression analysis and structural regression modeling test whether support for press access is best explained by societal power, media importance, or political attitudes. The findings indicate that support for press access is a political attitude such that the strongest predictors of support are community engagement and support for press rights, regardless of age, income, education, views toward newspaper reading, or other variables. Implications are discussed, including potential explanation for why support for freedom of information might ebb and flow during different times of societal community engagement. Also, the results provide insights for helping journalists, scholars, and citizens understand – and perhaps influence – public attitudes toward freedom of information and the laws that govern access.

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