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Showing 1 through 5 of 2,032 records.
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2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Irwin, Veronique. "Capacities to Achieve: Positive Teaching Mindsets and Student Achievement in First Grade" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-07-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1116679_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper aims to identify a causal relationship between teaching mindsets and student achievement in first grade. Teaching mindsets are defined as teachers’ expectations for student gains, which may reflect teachers’ evaluations of their capacity to teach or their students’ capacity to learn. Support for a causal relationship between teaching mindsets and student achievement is particularly strong in first grade because (1) younger students are enthusiastic about schooling, precluding a reverse causal argument, (2) students are somewhat randomly sorted into classrooms and spend their whole day under the instruction of a single teacher, which reduces the risk of selection bias or cumulative (dis)advantage, and (3) I find evidence that school organizational culture can influence teaching mindsets, net of the composition of the student body. Multilevel analyses focus on two dimensions of teaching mindsets, based on a set of questions from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS-K:2011), which I call Teacher Capacities and Student Capacities. Students whose teachers have more positive mindsets on the second measure perform better in reading, net of student background and school characteristics. This effect is strongest in schools where teachers are most likely to have low expectations for student achievement: public schools serving poor districts. Thus, rather than focusing on the resources and mindsets that students bring with them to school, this paper suggests that education research and policy efforts may be more effectively targeted towards teachers.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 13524 words || 
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2. Bauer, Gretchen. "Electoral Systems and Gender Quotas in Southern Africa: What Have They Achieved? What Can They Achieve?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2018-07-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p42462_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract

In 1997 southern African heads of state signed the Southern African Development Community Declaration on Gender and Development, committing themselves and their countries to the achievement of at least 30 percent women in all political and decision making structures by 2005. The achievement of such a critical mass of women in politics, it is argued, is essential to better meeting the needs and interests of women and children and to moving to eradicate gender inequalities. In 2004 and 2005 six Southern African Development Community (SADC) countries – Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe – held national legislative elections. While women activists had pinned their hopes on this set of elections, only two countries, Mozambique and South Africa (with Namibia close behind) met (slightly exceeded) the 30 percent target. The others lagged behind or just met the regional average of 15 percent women in a single or lower house of parliament in Africa. Through a careful reading of these six cases, this paper examines two aspects of the campaign to increase women’s participation and representation in politics and decision making in several SADC countries. First, it investigates the extent to which countries have actually manipulated electoral systems and adopted gender quotas to increase the percentage of women in elected office. Second, it probes the extent to which such institutional mechanisms, when utilized, make a tangible contribution toward achieving gender equality.

2012 - 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 134 words || 
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3. Lansdale, Jeffery. "Using formative assessment data to help teachers and school directors improve student achievement: The Honduras Improving Student Achievement Program (MIDEH)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, <Not Available>. 2018-07-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p553224_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The alignment of content standards, curriculum, instructional practices, and assessment is critical to improving student learning. From 2004 to the present, the Honduras MIDEH project has worked to support the Ministry of Education in Honduras to create content standards and align curriculum pedagogy, and assessment for the purposes of improving student learning. Diagnostic formative and summative assessments have driven the use of data for informed decision-making and created a practical cycle of data collection – analysis – utilization. This presentation will share the key strategies, best practices, and lessons learned about how to create an effective system of standards and assessment that informs decision-making at the local level as well as within the Ministry of Education. The presentation will link these strategies and informed decision-making to improvements in learning outcomes.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 385 words || 
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4. Watts, Tyler., Duncan, Greg., Clements, Douglas., Sarama, Julie., Wolfe, Christopher. and Spitler, Mary Elaine. "Early math skills and later achievement: Which kindergarten common core domains most predict fifth grade math achievement?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2018-07-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p958014_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: The era of standards reform in mathematics has recently culminated with the sweeping adoption of the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice (CCSSM) by over 40 states. However, surprisingly little research has investigated empirically whether the domains of knowledge endorsed by CCSSM predict later mathematics achievement. The current study examined the extent to which the various domain-specific proficiencies in mathematical knowledge promoted by the CCSSM in kindergarten (e.g. counting, operations, measurement, geometry) predict fifth grade mathematics achievement while also accounting for literacy and language skills, personal and family background characteristics, and teacher fixed effects.

Data were drawn from a sample of approximately 1300 children from low-income communities (83% recommended for free or reduced price lunch; 53% Black; 18% Hispanic). Participants were followed from preschool through the fifth grade, and their mathematical knowledge was assessed throughout this period with the Research-based Early Math Assessment (REMA; see Clements, Sarama, & Liu, 2008). The REMA was used to assess students across a wide variety of mathematical topics (e.g. geometry, patterning, calculation) at each grade. We coded the items of the REMA administered in the spring of kindergarten to the domain-specific competencies recommended for kindergarten students in the CCSSM. The current analysis employed OLS regression to relate fifth grade mathematics achievement to knowledge of individual CCSSM competencies in kindergarten. We used the multiple measurements of mathematical knowledge to reduce bias in our coefficients by controlling for knowledge of CCSSM competencies in preschool. This procedure allowed coefficients produced by kindergarten CCSSM measures to be interpreted as gains in each competency across the kindergarten year, and substantially limited sources of omitted variable bias by accounting for any omitted variable that would also have non-zero correlations with preschool mathematical knowledge. Further, because participants were clustered in classrooms, we employed a teacher fixed-effects model, which accounted for possible bias due to between-classroom differences.

Findings indicated that early numeracy competencies, specifically counting and operations, were the strongest predictors of grade 5 mathematics achievement (see Table 1). Geometry knowledge was also predictive, but less so, while measurement and patterning skills were not predictive of subsequent mathematics achievement.

Our results suggest that although students would benefit from knowledge across various domains of mathematics during kindergarten, numerical skills are most foundational to developing later mathematics achievement.

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