Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,808 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 362 - Next  Jump:
2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 104 words || 
Info
1. Marinelli, Kevin. "From the Rhetorical Act to Rhetorical Acting: Parallels and Possibilities for Rhetorical and Acting Theory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p419775_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since antiquity theorists and artists alike have driven a theoretical wedge between rhetoric and theater, the former ascribed to the realm of public deliberation and the latter to artistic expression. As scholars continue to push the limits of their disciplines, however, the boundaries between them continue to blur. Likewise, the purpose of this paper is to see how scholarship in each area may serve to inform one another. Centering on the work of Ernesto Grassi, I advocate a more performative view of rhetorical theory, as illustrated by several acting theorists, the goal of which is to provide new possibilities for theorizing the rhetorical situation.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 34 words || 
Info
2. Sasso, James. "Partisan Litigation: Why Politicians Litigated the Affordable Care Act, but Not the Wagner Act" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1346325_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: With hyper-polarization, politicians have sought out alternative routes to make or impact public policy. A comparison of the litigation around the Wagner Act and the ACA investigates whether partisan officials are increasingly litigating policies.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Cooren, Francois. "Acting for and Acting With: A Relational Approach to Agency" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1233502_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Can we recognize human agency while acknowledging other beings’ capacities to make a difference? This is one of the key questions I will address in this paper by defending a relational ontology, that is, an ontology that takes into account the relational character of the agentive dynamics of organizations, a dynamics where communication plays, as we will see, an essential role. Although the question of the relationship between organizational structure and human agency seems as old as the social sciences themselves (O’Donnell, 2010), I argue that defending this ontology does not force us to downplay what Bandura (2001) calls “the capacity to exercise control over the nature and quality of one’s life” (p. 1). Instead, I show that a relational ontology allows us to demonstrate that this human capacity, which is, of course, always relative and finite, must, by definition, deal with other forms of agency, and that there are analytical pay-offs to acknowledging them.

2012 - The Law and Society Association Words: 485 words || 
Info
4. Gaby, Sarah., Bond, Kay., Tyson, Karolyn., Morrill, Calvin. and Edelman, Lauren. "To Act or Not To Act: School Rules, School Socialization, and Student Collective Action" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village Resort, Honolulu, HI, Jun 03, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p559490_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, we explore the ways in which institutional factors and systems of authority in schools affect collective action among students. This study is informed by and seeks to contribute to work conducted by socio-legal researchers who have long examined the effect of legal systems on collective action and social movement scholars who examine the complex factors that lead to collective action. Using ethnographic, interview and survey data, we investigate regional and institutional patterns in the enforcement of school rules, occurrences of trouble incidents, and student responses to opportunities to take action in California, New York, and North Carolina high schools.

Preliminary findings on the nearly 40 different types of trouble incidents we have coded in the NY and NC schools show differences in student responses to mobilization opportunities, the types of rules emphasized and enforced, and the salience of incidents at the schools. For example, at the NC high school, discussions about rule enforcement and trouble incidents centered on dress code violations, smoking, and fighting. One of the fights frequently mentioned was a particularly serious event, referred to by school actors as a “race riot.” In NY, school actors were more likely to reference teacher-student disputes: at Lighthouse High School, teacher-student disputes ranked above all other incidents referenced in interviews or during field observations and at Terra Point High School, teacher-student disputes and fighting ranked among the most salient trouble incidents.

In addition to these regional differences in the types of rule violations and trouble incidents that seemed most salient to school actors, we also find differences in student socialization in terms of empowerment and agency. For example, when we look at suspension rates for 2006-07, which we view as an indicator of school repressiveness, we find that, despite similar levels of trouble incidents and activity that might likely merit suspension (e.g., gang activity), the NC high school had more suspensions than both Terra Point and Lighthouse, the latter of which had none. Differences in the levels of repressiveness between NC and NY schools may have contributed to students’ sense of efficacy and empowerment. When we examine incidents at each school that provided opportunities for collective action, we find that students in NY were more likely to act than those in NC. For instance, at Lighthouse we find three opportunities for collective action: the imposition of a cell phone ban, constraints placed on student participation in local protest events, and enforcement of school alcohol rules. In each case, the Lighthouse students engaged in collective action to push back against teachers and school administrators. The cell phone ban also applied to students at Terra Point and those students mobilized to protest it as well. In NC, the “race riot” provided an opportunity for students to push school administrators to address the racial problems at their school, which they complained about during our observations and in interviews. However, the students expressed resignation and did not mobilize.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 414 words || 
Info
5. Sircar, Althea. "Acting as a Body or Acting in Concert?: Hannah Arendt and Michel Henry" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1129856_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Numerous political theorists have turned to Hannah Arendt’s notion of “acting in concert” as inspiration for a democratic politics of action that can reconcile plurality with the founding, building, and sustaining work of political bodies. Recent work (in particular monographs by Ayten Gundogdu and Ella Myers) have positioned Arendt as a theorist who can help us understand political being-together in relation to both the actions of political groups and the ways individuals jointly care for the world. Central to these and other contemporary accounts of Arendt is attention to the harm, exclusion, or marginalization of those political subjects who are at the fringes of democracy. Underlying concern for marginalized subjects is a concern for the real-world situations of bodies, whether they are subjected to tear gas or internalized socio-cultural silencing. It is these bodies, however, that are rarely discussed in Arendt’s own account of action, but which are the necessary location of action. But are bodies sufficient for action? While Arendt’s emphasis on maintaining the political as a sphere for action suggests that some forms of social action are excluded, her readers hesitate to read her as ruling out some persons as political. At the same time, her account of action relies heavily on Heideggerian and Aristotelian intentionality of the will, as her late writings in The Life of the Mind suggest. This paper argues that placing the material, affective body at the center of our readings of Arendt provides us with new visions for how theories of political action can emerge from individual persons’ own embodied experiences. To this end, I turn to the twentieth century French phenomenologist Michel Henry’s theory of action as an immanent feature of all life (including but not limited to human beings), which he articulates in opposition to Heidegger’s account of Dasein. Henry provides a bridge between Heidegger’s reliance on thought and language, and Arendt’s on visible action as vehicles for intentionality. Instead, I argue that Henry, by displacing intentionality and emphasizing the affective nature of materiality, opens up alternative places that action can begin. These locations, in turn, fit easily within the situated examples Arendt provides of political action. The paper thus contributes to contemporary readings of Arendt and Heidegger on action and the will, while remedying Henry’s startling neglect of Arendt. In short, by giving Arendt a philosophical reading of the body and Henry a political reading of action, I offer a theory of embodied political action that locates the source of radicalism in individual bodies.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 362 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy